Surrealist Paintings by Steven Kenny.

Surrealist Paintings by Steven Kenny.
The Ribbons, 2015, oil on canvas, 40 x 28 inches.
An Interview with Steven Kenny.

Who and where are you from? 

My name is Steven Kenny. I grew up in a town called Peekskill which is in the beautiful Hudson Valley of New York, about 50 miles north of New York City.


How you got into this? 

In third grade I won first place in a Safety Poster Contest in my age group. That early artistic recognition and praise is very likely the event that set me on the path to becoming an artist.


What is your driving force? 

I think one of the main motivations for most artists is to be heard, seen, understood, appreciated, and loved. Since childhood, art has been the most effective way of attracting attention and expressing my thoughts and feelings. By creating objects of beauty that intrigue viewers I can arouse their curiosity, draw them in, and express myself on multiple, non-verbal levels.


What kind of work you do and why? 

I’m a surrealist. Surrealism allows me to express myself from an intuitive, unconscious place while still painting images that walk a line between reality and dream.

Figurative Art by Konstantinos Skopelitis.

Figurative Art by Konstantinos Skopelitis.
An Interview with Konstantinos Skopelitis.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Konstantinos Skopelitis, and  I'm an artist from Greece. I consider myself as an urban contemporary mostly figurative (but not only) artist ....
Born in a small fish village, my dad used to take me with him when going fishing. I was feeling nautious, my older brother was making fun of me, my dad laughing. I guess I wasn’t a natural talent ready to conquer the seas. I love travelling. Drawing and painting while listening to my favourite indie music

How you got into this?

I remember myself holding a pencil and drawing since I was a child. Drawing whatever triggered my wild imagination. Years went by and my pencil became a brush, a charcoal, a pen. The paper turned to a canvas and painting became a self-discovery journey. I relied on colours to express my feelings, my thoughts, my experiences. My pencil was my closest ally, always there to speak for me when the words couldn't. Faces, scenes from photos, a song I love, a place I visited, an old dusty book, vintage items, through my pop-art interpretation. 


What is your driving force?

My inspiration is hidden and found everywhere in life. My technique can cover mixed media from acrylic, ink, oil, collage among others. Every inspiration is a new journey. Every journey is a new challenge; a challenge I am always willing to take up." When I  hear a story I’m trying to create an image, a face, a woman face at most of the times that suits with the story. Mixing reality and fantasy, with a comic aesthetic often, I create on my mind a figure and that’s it. Make your own story. That’s my moto. That’s how I see it. 

What kind of work you do and why?

It’s mainly ink. Indian and sumi ink. Black and white. My favorite. Drawing with charcoal, acrylic paints, oil, mixing, exploring. Working on newspaper pages… Drawing on the ephemeral. Extending the expire date. Working on old book pages .Make the page my own canvas. A new story covers the old one, fulfilling or maybe changing the meaning. It depends on the viewer and his need to understand why. News and stories. Woman jumping out of book pages bringing their own stories abroad. 

Why women?

Their faces mirroring their emotions almost effortlessly. I capture the moment I want to keep. Do I portray my own likes and beliefs on them? Maybe. A friend noticed that many have blue eyes. She asked me what does it mean. Is it my wife’s blue eyes? The contrast it creates with black? I have to think about it. I’m still discovering myself. When I see a photo or something that intrigues me, an image starts flashing in my head. It has a crush effect, it swallows me defines my moves as the face starts to take shape.

Please tell us more about your thought process.

I love escaping through my art. Life is a crossroad. Life and survival in the Greece of recession crossing over dreams and future steps. Do I call myself an artist? Let me answer this first. What is art? Art is an imaginary shelter for me where I can create from nothing. Every time a new artwork jumps out, it’s another step to my vision. A progress is made and the satisfaction that it’s better than the previous make me feel happy. I don’t know what I will be able to create in the future but maybe this is the most fascinating part of my art vision. There are no borders at all…

In my new series I’m exploring different techniques, bringing more colour, using rough, abstract brushes to create my layers of beauty.

Paintings by Michael Simms from Australia.

Paintings by Michael Simms from Australia.
LoveStick_91x102cm_OilOnCanvas.
An Interview with Michael Simms.

Who and where are you from?

I’m an Australian artist called Michael Simms. I was born in Adelaide in 1987 and moved to Sydney in 2011 where I am now based.

How you got into this?

I spent a lot of time drawing in the home growing up and loved art at school, but I never considered pursuing it as more than a hobby. I eventually studied psychology at university and drew in my spare time. A few years after graduating, I attended evening classes at an art school and went on to win a scholarship to study there full-time. This was the tipping point when art began to take over my life. It was like an addiction. I couldn’t get enough and have continued to dedicate my life to it since then.

When I finished at art school, I created work at home and began entering prizes. This lead to several opportunities to exhibit and commissions – and now I share a studio and gallery space alongside five other artists in North Sydney.

What is your driving force?

The desire to create art is something instinctive that I find difficult to articulate. I’m sure most artists will attest to ‘ebbs and flows’ inherent in the creative process, but the basic joy I find in the art making is the core motivator. 

More specifically, the subject matter is an important driving force. I have to feel a strong connection to what I’m capturing – whether it’s the subject of a portrait, the landscape or symbolic imagery. There has to be genuine passion in order for me to feel creative energy and get into a productive flow.

I also draw inspiration from the work of other artists – painters obviously, but also filmmakers, musicians, writers and actors.  

What kind of work you do and why?

I move between portraiture, landscapes and allegorical works, and am inspired by subjects on the cusp of change.

I find people and the human face infinitely fascinating, and love to experiment with colour, lighting, and subtle expressions to convey their unique temperaments. My work also investigates the evolving notion of portraiture in our culture that is increasingly proliferated with smartphone cameras. I comment on the gap between the authentic self and the ‘virtual self’, and use masks and distortions as a metaphor to explore this.

When it comes to landscapes, my goal is to create dream-like atmospheres that capture the brief moment before an environment is plunged into darkness. I’m drawn to imagery that’s dangerous and beautiful at the same time and reflects the extremes in light and darkness that exists in the world.

Figurative Paintings by Anderson Santos.

Figurative Paintings by Anderson Santos.
Rosso, óleo sobre tela, 46x38cm, 2017.
An Interview with Anderson Santos.

Who and where are you from?

Hello, I'm Anderson Santos a figurative painter born in Salvador, Bahia in Brazil in 1973. I studied Fine Arts at the Federal University of Bahia and today I live and work between Salvador and Milano, Italy, where I am artistic director of the art and technology startup called Ripensarte.

How you got into this?

Because of the work of my father who is a designer, I always had access to drawing materials at home and from a very early start I began to draw. The painting came later, when I was a teenager, it appeared as a need to put color in the drawings that I made. I started first with acrylic paint and already in the School of Fine Arts I met, through colleagues, the technique of oil on canvas and since then I dedicate myself to learn more about it. In 2015 I bought an Ipad and I discovered professional applications to draw and paint directly on the glass screen and I have produced many drawings and digital paintings. I my opinion the digital satisty my old desire to make multiples of my work, like engravings.

What is your driving force?

It seems to me that, today, what moves me is a vital need to paint, to transform what I see and feel in drawing or painting. If I do not paint or draw I do not feel complete, it has become something necessary like blinking, breathing or sleeping. I need to paint.

What kind of work you do and why?

I am a painter who is interested in the human figure, my painting is realistic and I basically make portraits of people and animals. I study very much the work of other painters and I make many references in my painting to the work of Velasquez and Francis Bacon that are for me the starting point. I'm interested in seeing how the time affects the skin, how it leaves marks and now how it rearranges the bodies.

Please tell us more about your thought process.

I always start from an idea and then I turn it into a photographic reference. If I already have a photograph that serves me to paint this idea, it's okay, If not, I make photographs with a model. Then I start painting, by digital or oil on canvas. At that point, what I'm interested in is how much I can put on or get out of there, without getting too far away from the starting point. When I'm painting a woman, I would like you to recognize that it's a woman, not a dog, but, at the same time, I wish that the marks on it should suggest you that you are looking to a paint arranging on canvas. Reminding that what's before your eyes is a painting, a work by a brain and human hands.

Paintings by Arturo Samaniego.

Paintings by Arturo Samaniego.
An Interview with Arturo Samaniego.

Where are you from and how you got into this?

I was born in Mexico, where I did my initial studies in drawing and painting. I went to University of Texas where I obtained degrees in Fine Art as well as Computer Science. For 15 years after that my life was split between the business world in computers, and the Art world. In 2004 I decided to leave the corporate environment to pursue my true calling and devote myself to the creation of Art. It was a difficult transition but one I will never regret.

What is your driving force?

I believe great Art requires Creativity and inspiration, but also a high level of Craftsmanship. For this reason, throughout my career, I have strived for a refined technique that becomes the instrument of  a personal artistic language.


What kind of work you do and why?

The Sea  has been a recurring theme in my paintings of the last few years, for many reasons: Its great beauty and mistery, its metaphorical representation of life itself, enveloping and nurturing on the surface, but also unpredictable and treacherous like the currents and surf that inhabit it.

My newest series of Oval paintings explores the always exciting relationship between representational and Abstract, with both styles interacting in a visual dialogue.

My work is currently displayed in galleries accross the United States, including Mary Martin Gallery of Naples, Fl and in Charleston, SC. I have had solo and group shows in New York, Miami, and Austin, among many others.

My paintings are in private collections around the world, and have been featured in many prestigious publications such as International Artist Magazine, Juxtapoze, Manifest Galllery International Painting Annual, Studio Visit Magazine, The ArtList Editors, etc.

Portraiture Paintings by Sal Jones from London.

Portraiture Paintings by Sal Jones from London.
Here I Am, Inside, oil on canvas, 100 x 70 cm
An Interview with Sal Jones.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Sal Jones, I’m a contemporary figurative artist working predominantly with oil on canvas.Originally I’m from the East Midlands area but I have been in London for a long time now, I live and have a studio space in Hackney, London.

How you got into this?

I always created things from a young age (whether sticking things down, painting or cutting things up). I studied Fine Art at college and later did a PGCE in Art & Design Education. I have worked across various art forms and media in the past (including painting, assemblage sculpture, analogue and digital photography). As well as my art practices I have taught Art & Design, undertaken residencies in schools and work freelance in the Art & Design education sector. 


What is your driving force?

I get a sense of satisfaction out of creating art and I enjoy seeing an image appear. The possibilities when a painting is only partially complete are really exciting - that’s where the energy comes from.

I like to think making art it is a form of communication with others, as the artist, I select the images and paint them in a way that perhaps says more about how I am feeling and the context in which they are created than I realise. 

What kind of work you do and why?

The paintings I have been doing recently are best described as a reinterpretation of the portraiture tradition with an emphasis on emotional conflict and expression. But unlike traditional portraiture, there are no sitters and they do not represent a specific person but rather suggest an emotive state. They are not specifically posed but capture a moment in time. I hope to draw the viewer into an unknown scenario, one in which they are invited to speculate what the subject is thinking about.The paintings have been inspired by images of facial expressions appropriated from film, and the media, which have been taken out of context and re-presented as paintings, with an emphasis on colour, and mark making.

I have been using dialogue as titles to open up a line of communication between subject and spectator. I hope to interact with the viewer by creating works that they can relate to or empathise with on a personal level.


Please tell us more about your thought process.

I like to think of my paintings as a commentary on what it is like and how it feels to live or even just to exist in our times. 

I don’t draw out the image in advance but work with thin washes of paint to plan out the image directly onto the canvas, once the composition is established I then work on layers of paint using brushes and palette knife.Experimenting with paint application is part of the process.

I usually start with a photograph or series of photos that I use as a resource to plan the composition and to get enough of the representation that I require – but that’s where it ends – I then use colour and mark-making to emphasise the expression and emotion of the subject, I’m not interested in a photo-realist finish. I suppose I sort of re-animate a photographic source through the painting process.

Realistic Figurative Paintings by Enrique Collar.

Realistic Figurative Paintings by Enrique Collar.
Bollywood #14, oil on linen 120×80 cm 2014
An Interview with Enrique Collar.

Who and where are you from?

I was born in the countryside of Paraguay, I grew up in Buenos Aires and I live and work in Rotterdam since 2003. I am a visual artist and a film director.

How you got into this? 

Painting caught me from the first moment I discovered it. As a child I studied comic strips which came by mail. As a teenager I worked in printing companies. The reproduction, the ink, the papers and the needed recovery of my first years of life in the field of Paraguay, pushed me towards the art. 

I came in the world of cinema because of painting. During the last decade of the twentieth century, I drew and painted intensely Paraguay, My work was created within the Latin American cultural context, with myths and realities. This work became very important for the Visual Arts of my country, and that I developed this without being aware of this.

When I came to Holland, I decided to close this period and start another. I was always a figurative artist, although I allowed myself to explore various currents of art history, which I interpret in a “nonlinear way". In this new stage, (which you can see in the photographs) I introduced my painting to the visual qualities that were appearing in this digital life. I chose to concentrate on the pictorial act of the details; the light and the forms. As I changed cameras, my paintings varied. In other words; I did the opposite of my Latin American period, where I prioritized the language of space, composition and narrative. But slowly, from large portraits I’m going back to the concepts of space, but now from a different perspective. I believe in the process of visual thinking and how this modifies our vision.

What is your driving force?

The history of art, the art of painting and for past few years the fascination for the new visual tools that Technology can give us. Putting technology together with the tradition of 500 years painting makes me enthousiastic. One of my latest projects is: Universal Painting Project 360° VR, paintings in 360 degrees, which can already be seen on my website, but the originals will be part of an upcoming exhibition in Rotterdam.

What kind of work you do and why?

I have always been fascinated by the representation of reality in a flat world through pictorial language. In three decades of artwork, my perception changed over multiple periods. I also added the language of cinema, narrative in time and script writing in what paintings mean to me. Teamwork with technicians from different disciplines and actors was an important human experience. Thanks to the cinema I could incorporate the concept of 360 degrees in my paintings, and this makes me excited.

Please tell us more about your thought process.

When I started, I drew from a direct model and then painted these drawings. Then I experimented with analog photography, and collages. Later photoshop, screens, tablets, and video Stills. I do not have a unique methodology of work. It depends a lot on the project type and sometimes the mood.

The art of painting is for me the most essential language where I concentrate my emotions, my ideas and the real time that I live with every work. This process can take me up to several weeks. It is difficult to maintain a work routine or draw accurately on the canvas what I’m going to paint. I need the stain, the gesture, the error, different techniques. I need the layers of paint that, although they may disappear at first sight, they remain there under what we see, as a heart secretly beating. To sum up my sensitivity towards pictorial language; I am interested both in the art of Willem de Kooning as well as in the art of Lucien Freud, and I have always been deeply excited by Vermeer of Delft.

Figurative Paintings by Karen Bradley.

Figurative Paintings by Karen Bradley.
Daydreamer.
From the Brush of Karen Bradley.

I am a contemporary realist painter based in Savannah, GA. I have always loved drawing the figure. My background is in Medical illustration, which offered some figurative illustration here and there, but ultimately I wanted more than purely meeting someone else’s objective. I truly loved portraiture and began to study it more seriously than ever about 6 years ago. The more workshops and conventions I attended, the more hope I had that I could make a living out of doing what I love. I would say my driving force is self expression. Most of my models are women because, well, they are beautiful and also I relate best to them. Sometimes I want to paint a face because I can’t stop looking at it and other times it’s a feeling or condition that I want to express. 

I do have a 10-month old which has cut way into my painting time. This has changed the way I paint because of all the interruptions and also changed the way I feel about painting. Painting from life is very fulfilling for me… the process and the outcome. Fulfilling my needs seems more important than ever now. So I have scheduled friends to come sit for me every Saturday while my husband can keep the baby. I also am doing a paintings per day for 60 days.These practices are to keep me going even when it feels like too much work. Posting to social media helps keep me accountable and connected to my artist friends. It also can be an advertising tool, I suppose. 

I have a solo show coming up in April which will be figurative in subject matter with focus on the human condition and intimacy, and a lack there of. This topic interests me so much and I look forward to diving into it. 

I’ve placed my bio below for a little more on what and why I paint.

Karen Bradley is a contemporary figurative realist oil painter based in Savannah, GA. Her paintings focus on portraiture and figurative subject matter. Her inspiration comes primarily from people she encounters, their expressive qualities and patterns of light and shadow that reveal them. Karen’s works are honest visual interpretations of her experiences as she perceives them.

Karen has participated in several solo and group exhibitions, and her figurative paintings have won numerous awards including first place and Best of Show. Her work is featured in numerous private and public collections.

Karen’s artistic career began in Medical Illustration. She served as a Foundations Faculty member for several years at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Her passion for the human figure drove her to pursue greater education in figurative painting. Karen studied at the Art Student’s League of New York as well as Studio Incamminati of Philadelphia and has worked with many established artists such as Joseph Todorovitch, Max Ginsberg, and Robert Liberace. She is an active member of the Oil Painters of America and The Portrait Society of America. 

Paintings by Nina Hansen from Denmark.

Paintings by Nina Hansen from Denmark.
Go for it 50x50 cm.
An Interview with Nina Hansen.

Who and from where are you?

My name is Nina Hansen. I was born in Bergen, Norway. Now living in Denmark.

How you got into this?

I have always been fascinated by art and design. I have been drawing since I was a child. At that time I drew mostly animals, like dogs and horses. Later I have started to paint with acrylic on canvas.

What is your driving force?

Being creative has always been a driving force in my life. Painting is my soul, and gives me great joy and relaxation. It lends me the opportunity to express myself and release an otherwise uncontrollable energy, which bring my back to the studio almost every day. I love to find new ways to express myself, and the idea to focus on details in a new way is very rewarding

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint mostly whit acrylic and paint marker. My paintings are abstract and contemporary with strong vibrant colors. I am experimenting with shape, colors and different techniques. My tools are usually painting knife, spatula and fingers. It is impossible for me to predict the final outcome. It is evolving gradually in the making.

The vivid colors are meant to induce happiness and vitality to the viewer.

I am working with intuition and expressionism. The process is investigative, and the randomness of
sudden evolving shapes and strokes, are creating a multitude of paths. 

My final goal is to take the viewer on a trip in to their own imagination……. and out of the ordinary.

Portraiture Paintings by Joel Martimbeault.

Portraiture Paintings by Joel Martimbeault.
The Gift.
An Interview with Joel Martimbeault.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Joel Martimbeault and i was born in Manitoba Canada, but have lived most of my life in and around Montreal, Quebec. 

How you got into this?

I only took up painting more seriously in my forties, visual arts seeming like the next step for someone who had always delved in creative and visual disciplines: graphic arts, woodworking and interior design. For the most part i am a self-taught artist, initially experimenting with color and texture with abstract landscapes. Moving into portraiture, i continued working with similar textures and bold colors. As I began this foray into portraits i also completed a certification as a life coach. This had a huge influence on how i approached painting from that point on. Bringing these 2 passions together influenced me to make the emotion the true subject of my work. 

What is my driving force?

Connection. 
The connection and intimacy with the subject that builds up through the process of painting. An opportunity to connect with the emotion, to experience it through art in a way i don't always allow myself to in everyday life. Connecting and moving people with my work. My greatest accomplishment is knowing that i can move people with my art.

What kind of work you do and why? 

My process begins by first choosing the emotion i feel i need to explore; something personal i can relate to and connect with. I choose my subjects with the knowledge that they can channel those feelings, that experience. We find common ground and i get to experience it through them. It's a very intimate and rewarding process for me. 

The eyes are where I first focus when I begin my work. There is where I can capture and immortalize the feeling that my subject portrays. With my expressive use of colour I hope to evoke the spiritual and emotional statement of my subject. I like to juxtapose the linear rhythms of my brushstrokes against the tactile and textural swathes of the palette knife. The quick application of paint allows me to express the immediacy of the moment; for I believe that emotions can change in a split second. The highs and lows of shadows create a contrast that may enhance or contradict the sentiment.  My background as a life coach has allowed me to have a close relationship with feelings and emotions and I welcome the viewer to create their own interpretation of what the person may be experiencing.

In a time of selfies and social narcissism  I want the emotion to take front stage, to allow ourselves to view the subject from within.

Figurative Paintings by Eric Zener.

Figurative Paintings by Eric Zener.
Gliding
An Interview with Eric Zener.

Who and where are you from?

I am from California. I live just across the San Francisco Bay and my studio is in Sausalito on the water. I grew up mainly in Southern California, lived in Australia and Spain later, and have spent the last 25 years here.

How you got into this?

I as child I loved making art, and lived in a household that was creative.  After college I awakened that joy of painting again and painted at first for a hobby, and then shortly after dedicated it to my career.  I have been painting full time professionally now for almost 30 years.

What is your driving force?

It slowly just because “who you are” more than a driving force.  That said I am drawn to the creative world as a whole.  I react emotionally and viscerally to music, art, film etc.  Painting for me is an exploration of thoughts and ideas and emotions - ofter cathartic or illustrative of the things I think and value.


What kind of work you do and why?

I paint images that speak to the universal yearning to transform and evolve as a person.  I use water as a great abyss to escape into the vulnerability of searching. Sleep as the mysterious place 8 hours we go into another world to escape and dream. Other imagery is largely about the similar concept of personal reflection and transformation.

Figurative, Realistic Paintings by Patricia Guzman.

Figurative, Realistic Paintings by Patricia Guzman.
Sueños-de-Nala-Patricia-Guzmán-acuarela-53-x-73-cms-23000-seleccionado-para-la-Trienal-de-Acuarela-de-Colombia-2015.
An Interview with Patricia Guzman.

Who and where are you from?

Painter born and raised in Mexico City.

How you got into this?

Born in artistic family, denied painting until life itself gave me no choice, I had to paint in order to earn some money and survive, painting was the only thing I could do having no degree. However, when I was 27 I realized how wise life had been, how it made total sense that painting was the path for me. From that moment on, I embraced painting with full commitment, as I got to understand a much deeper meaning for it. 

What is your driving force?

To create something new, something that has never seen before, to stop the viewer’s mind for a moment and transport them to a different world. To add something to the canon of art, to make art that could transcend cultures and time. 

What kind of work you do and why?

Figurative, realistic images of different realities that speak about our experience as human beings, of the emotions shared by all. I feel affected of the things happening around me and feel the need to speak about it through paint.

Painting is so fascinating as the way I understand it, it is a path to the inner self, it is a constant voyage to getting to know oneself better and to remove the systems of beliefs and thoughts that don’t belong to the self. It is a cleansing process of unearthing the sacred jewels we all have, deep inside. It is to believe in this voice as we’ve been programmed to listen to the outside instead of the inside. Therefore, the hardest part and most rewarding is to believe in this voice and to have to courage to follow it through. I think it is a lifelong challenge that makes life worth living in a passionate, fullest way. 

Please tell us more about your thought process.

I love the way light dances across a face or figure, I like to paint in big or medium formats (larger than life) so that we can see a face in a distinct perspective from our everyday point of view. I’d like people to stop and to look to a native person’s face in a completely different way, being larger than life and being filled with so much information such as the wrinkles, the changes in tones and colors but most importantly, the expression, the feelings. The lyrics of the son echoes by Pink Floyd deeply resonate with the feeling I have when painting a portrait: 
..By chance two separate glances meet
And I am you and what I see is me ..
Being this my supreme objective for people to have when looking at the work. 

I observe the world around me and there are many things that cause pain and frustration. I feel the need to say something about it through paint, perhaps it is my way of coping with it, of trying to understand, of stopping the world around me and allowing that to happen, to not deny it. I am not trying to change any person point of view, or trying to mirror reality, it’s just a need for me, of shedding light into the terrible situations around us. Examples of this are paintings like: Forgotten, Justice, 43, Vivasnosqueremos .. YA BASTA" (We want us alive .. STOP). 

Art by Carlos Barrios.

Art by Carlos Barrios.
An Interview with Carlos Barrios.

Who and where are you from?

I am carlos barrios, born in El Salvador Central America, i have also spend some time in Honduras as my father family was from that country.
Moved to australia in 1990 and since then i have been very happy working in this country.
My practice include painting, drawing, ceramics and mixed media.

How you got into this?

To me art came as a young child. 
The civil war in my childhood period was a terrible one
We spent many periods indoors 
My father was a bit of collector of art and ancient artefacts 
Also we visited many old ancient cities 
For me it came I believe from some of this experiences, i also have the recollection of picking up in an old Mayan place a small stone with carvings.   I would watch this stone for hours looking at the lines and seeing visions on them.

So this energy or curiosity that society calls art came in that moment and became a very strong part of my essence .

What is your driving force?

My driving force is a strong Desiree to create images or just to observe them evolving in front of my eyes.   Is almost like a magical or misting experience really.  To be part of an universe that we cant fully understand, less explains.

To reach certain state.
Is a very addictive activity really

What kind of work you do and why?

I use what is around me in terms of materials.
Always have a lot of paper, paint, linen, crayons etc and move between pieces making marks and let them became something.

fACES by Robin Norman from Sweden.

fACES by Robin Norman from Sweden.
An Interview with Robin Norman.

Who are you and where are you from?

My name is Robin Norman and im an artist from a small town called Åmål in Sweden. I have moved around a bit, but live and work here for now.

How you got in to this?

I have always been intrested in creating and making art in different forms. I have been drawing and painting since forever. In the latest years I have started making music. I think I started making stuff early because it felt good and I got some kind of reward inside my brain. 

What is your driving force?

I MUST make something every day, otherwise i dont feel well. I have an urge to take my thoughts and place them outside my head in different forms. So I can understand it better. 
I am what i make. I suffer from mental illness and it helps to make art. 

What kind of work do you do and why? 

Im in love with grafit. That is my to-go-to material. Just a pencil and a paper. But I try to work with everything i can get my hands on. My favorite subject is the human. Mostly the head. I try to variate me, but in a perfect world i would just sit and draw different faces all day.

Figurative Paintings by Rabecca Signoriello.

Figurative Paintings by Rabecca Signoriello.
Adrift
An Interview with Rabecca Signoriello.

Who and where are you from?

I am an artist and laborer residing in New Castle, Pennsylvania. I paint in the winters and pave roads in the summers. Having two very different jobs does make me feel like I lead two different lives, but doing this also gives me a chance to step back and contemplate my choices as well as what I want in the future.

How did you get into this?

I have always drawn as a child but was immersed in the fine arts when I was an undergraduate at Edinboro University. The support and knowledge of the professors in the art department at Edinboro was one of the reasons I was inspired and continued on to the New York Academy of Art for my MFA in painting. 

What is your driving force?

I paint in hopes of creating something that connects me and my life to the viewer. I am forever a student, and always wanting know more and be better is a huge driving force for my paintings. i learn something from everything I create.

What kind of work you do and why?

My primary focus is the figure. I love painting flesh. Figurative arts makes me feel connected with my subjects, my process, and my viewers. 
I mainly paint people who are in my life. My paintings are most often allegorical or surreal versions of my life and those around me. I also like painting straight-forward portraits, and scenes of everyday life as I see it.

Art by Óscar Sanmartín Vargas from Spain.

Art by Óscar Sanmartín Vargas from Spain.
An Interview with Óscar Sanmartín Vargas.

Who and where are you from?

I am 45 years old and I was born in Zaragoza a medium city in the northeast of Spain between Madrid and Barcelona.

How you got into this?

Painting and drawing since childhood. After studying high school I went to an Academy of Fine Arts and started painting oil. After a few years of dedicating myself exclusively to art I began to do film and television works and for a time I participated in television series and some feature film. Later I started working in the publishing world and began to make covers for books and illustrated albums, an activity that I am currently working on together with the design of album covers.

What is your driving force?

I think that drawing and art in general is a game that connects us with the mysterious. It is a way to get in touch with a part of us that normally remains hidden but is able to surface when you work. Those are the two components that move my way of working, the game and the mysterious.

What kind of work you do and why?

I spent a lot of time drawing and painting oil but over the years it seemed monotonous and predictable and solitary, so I began to explore other areas such as cinema or illustration. I also found it interesting to jump to the volume building dioramas and miniature sets. At the moment I am dedicated to the illustration of books and the design of covers of music albums.

Drawings by Mani from France.

Drawings by Mani from France.
An Interview with Mani.

Who and where are you from ?

Hi ! I'm Mani. I work and live in Lyon, France, I do drawings and other imagery things like that. First I was a cinema addict, I had no realy artistic education, but very soon I developped a visual mind, and a personnal affinity with langage of pictures. So I began Cinema studies.


How you got into this ?

I draw with my simple ballpoint pen since almost ten years !

I first drawn during university classes. While I was listening teachers, I let my ballpoint pen slide on the side of my sheets... And when I had to choose what will I do after university, I just look back at my papers and discoverd thousands of drawings forming a single universe... So I decided to experiment this drawing way rather than continue studies... wonder where it would leading me... Now I develop all this cosmogony through drawings, animation, and stencil street arts since almost ten years...


What is your driving force ?

Honestly I let my hand lead me. Not trying to think about a concept nore a shape...
As I am a slow worker, I have all the time to find a continuity and equilibrium into the draw. I shape my whole artworks with all the forms I have memorise in the world outside. It's like a piling up of all stuff I saw during my life, organized into a metaphoric configuration that's opening towards an interpretation of how the world works.


What kind of work you do and why ?

I just draw, because I can't do something else ! Also because it's the more natural thing, the most efficious and relaxing stuff I need to be a stable personne :) I try to put in my artworks my whole point of view on our humanity. That's why there is humor, sadness, sorrow, questioning, surprises, some kind of greatness and emptyness in the same time... and so and so in it. I want people who are taking time to look at my work understand that they are actually looking at themselves !

Sculpture Artist Nick Ervinck from Belgium.

Sculpture Artist Nick Ervinck from Belgium.
NABEKIARTS
An Interview with Nick Ervinck.

Who and where are you from:

I am an artist born in 1981 in Belgium. Currently I have my own studio in Lichtervelde, Belgium. The focus of my work is digital prints, 3D prints and large polyester sculptures.

How you got into this?

I have always wanted to be an accountant, art was never a topic in our home, I never even visited a museum when I was younger. Play has always been there in my life. When I was very young, I played and built things with Lego blocks. Later, this turned into the virtual building blocks of a whole series of God games; computer games such as SimCity, Settlers, Traffic Tycoon and Caesar. I'm sure that this is how my understanding of computers came about. Architecture has always fascinated me, so it was my first choice when I switched to art school. But the lessons on perspective theory didn't interest me and the scale models I made were not always feasible because I wanted to go beyond what was being offered to me on the course. I switched to ceramics and graphic design. When I discovered software such as Photoshop, a whole new world opened up to me. I suddenly realised that you can do a lot more with a computer than just play games. I studied 3D multimedia at Ghent Academy. My focus was primarily on performance and video art then, and I played around with computer effects. But I didn't really find my way in this and so I switched to the Mixed Media course. There, I gradually found my feet.

What is you driving force?

Everything I do is about the freedom that I need to preserve in order to be able to create. you play God over the world that you've created yourself. You have complete control over the laws of nature. A few extra suns or trees raining out of the sky? Done. There are barely any limits and I find that fascinating. What I do as an artist, I do 24/7. It's my passion, it's the reason I get up in the morning. I actually see the computer as an extension of my body: an external hard drive in which I save all my images in order to create extra space in my head. I am constantly moving forward, expanding my oeuvre and reframing my concepts.

What kind of work you do and why?

The studio takes a vanguard position in the field of digital technology (such as 3D technology and computational design methods). My oeuvre has one foot firmly planted in the digital world. Using copy paste, and depending on the actual task and its context, I apply images, shapes and textures of extremely diverse origins.  I create my own universe while simultaneously referencing both classical sculpture and contemporary pop culture. I explore the boundaries between various media, in order to explore the aesthetic potential of sculpture, 3D prints installation, architecture and design. Consequently, I am particularly interested in how the computer can be used in the realisation of new, organic and experimental (negative) spaces and sculptures within sculptures and how the tension between blobs and boxes is articulated during the digital designing process.

Nude Figurative Paintings by Francisco Jose Jimenez.

Nude Figurative Paintings by Francisco Jose Jimenez.
Breathe 135 x 105 cm Mixed media on canvass.
An Interview with Francisco Jose Jimenez.


Who and where are you from?

My name is Francisco Jose Jimenez and I am from Spain. I've been living in London for 6 years. My studio is based in Wimbledon.  

How you got into this?

That was long time ago. When I was a kid I didn't realise I had the skill but once you start to develop some different techniques and you see how the people appreciate your work, it just became my whole life. The style, the colours, the paintings in general...they change with the time. It's an evolution that grows and I always think that devoting my life to it makes me grow as well as a person.


What is your driving force?

Art is everything to me. It's the way I have to express everything I cannot do through words. Since I wake up until I go to bed again in the night, the art is always around me.


What kind of work you do and why?

I would say that my artworks reflect my own vision of the people. It as well express my constant fight to find the meaning of myself in the person I paint. When I finish a piece, my satisfaction can be measure on the success I had reflecting myself in the person in the canvas. 

I have always felt attracted by nudity, the flowing lines of the human body and the aura that surrounds people. Knowing people through painting is wonderful, you can reach their most intimate places, even to their consciousness.
When we create that aura between the person and painting all these questions arise, which at the end are beautiful imperfections in search of a meaning. In this moment we forget ourselves, Here the body lines stumble upon thoughts. Traveling between the beauty and the sadness. This is the meaning of my painting.

Abstract Expressionistic Paintings by Angel Reyes.

Abstract Expressionistic Paintings by Angel Reyes.
An Interview with Angel Reyes.


Who and where are you from?

My name is Angel Reyes, I was born and raised in Puerto Rico where I'm currently living.

How you got into this?

Since I can remember, I've been fascinated with drawing and sketching. At a very young age I started drawing everything that caught my eye every time I had an opportunity, and I've always been charmed by the fact that you can mimic anything you see with just a pencil and/or some pigments on a blank sheet of paper or canvas, or any other surface for that matter. But I wasn't serious about it until I saw an instructional video from a famous artist on YouTube in 2013. I was just mesmerized by the way he created this amazing works of art just with the pallet knife and some oil paints. At that moment I decided I wanted to do that for a living. 

What is your driving force?

I'm driven by the colorful essence and beauty of everything in the process of life. 

What kind of work you do?

As time passed I have developed my own painting style through experimentation and constant learning and practice. So most of my work could be considered as abstract expressionism and neo figurative. 


Why you do it?

I like to bend and break rules. There's no boundaries to what can be create as an abstract expressionistic artist.

What media and technique do you use?

I prefer acrylic paint but I also use digital software. Mainly I use pallet knife or mixed technique.