Paintings by Scott Hutchison.

Paintings by Scott Hutchison.
Her Echo - Her Shadow.
An Interview with Scott Hutchison.

Who and from where are you from?

My name is Scott Hutchison. I am a painting and drawing professor at Georgetown University in Washington DC.  I have been painting professionally for over 20 years and currently paint out of my home studio in Arlington Virginia. (A few photos attached) 

How you got into this?

My work has evolved a lot over the years. My current body of paintings are a culmination of years of creating. Essentially, one pieces leads to another, and so on, so it's difficult to fully describe how I came to do what I do now. However, I will say that the model is my main source of inspiration. I work from a model's pose and begin expanding or subtracting from there. Think of the model a song's melody.  I try to compose around that melody; manipulating it, repeating it and changing its tone and colors. The pose I choose is wholly based on my gut instinct. I look for that initial personality or inner life within the pose or gaze.  

What is your driving force?

My paintings and drawings are comprised of overlapping figures stitched together in one composition. They are multifaceted, abstracted, and meant to evoke the idea that our identity is in flux. Though we are singular beings, our psyche is not. We are molded in part by time and our life experiences. 

The subjects in my paintings personify the strength and frailty of consciousness and the depths to which we experience the human condition. The figures are displaced, out of sync and created from a multitude of people, like ghosts or layered memories, both timeless and self-aware.

All of my work can be seen as a journal entry, the manifestation of a deep concern for place and purpose in this world. I reassign faces and body parts through a mixture of trial and error, coupled with random chance and the need to create something from nothing.  During this process, I am fully aware that I am seeking answers to a larger question: Who or what defines us as an individual? Are we here by accident, or is there an invisible hand at play? Why are we here? Is there a purpose, or are we just a product of our culture and our experiences? My art is meant to tug at the viewer and suggest that there is more to the material world.

What kind of work you do and why?

As I mentioned before, my painting style has evolved a great deal over my career. I am particularly proud of the fact that my work has changed and my styles altered to reflect my personal and artistic concerns.Timeline The techniques I use today best reflect what I am trying to say about the ideas of self. The real vs the unreal, or the physical vs the psychological. For example, the dark backgrounds isolate the figure and allow me to create a greater amount of illusory realistic depth. However, I also use synthetic colors to evoke a psychological conflict within the work.

So what are your future plans? 

I am currently doing small to mid-sized portraits focused pieces, but I see myself moving toward larger multi-figurative paintings in the near future. I would also like to expand my subject matter by incorporating the background and possibly changing the shape of my canvases to enhance the broken and reassembled themes within the picture plane.  I have no gallery openings currently planned, but I am excited to be showing my work at a new contemporary art fair called Superfine DC early November 2018. 

Please share with us the artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I am inspired by artists that use light and contrast by deploying a technique called chiaroscuro:
A few artists I follow that also use this technique extremely well: Caravaggio:  and Vincent Desiderio .

Figurative Stories by Lupo Sol.

Figurative Stories by Lupo Sol.
The_kite_of_the_grandpa.
An Interview with Lupo Sol.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Pedro, although my friends call me Kepa. I use Lupo Sol as a stage name, so as you can see, there are already too many names! You can call me Lupo simply.

I was born in Euskadi, north of Spain, but I have lived in Alicante for five years.

What brought you to Art?

Although I always drew, I did comics and things like that, I did not start painting seriously until 2015. After being a web designer and developer in Madrid, I moved to Alicante to be with my girlfriend and, yes, to try to change course in my life.

One day, she, my wife, gave me a box of acrylic paints and I began little by little to resume my hobby, until I came to think of art as the liberator of my ruin, ha ha, but I am still in ruins and also crazy. So, I subsist as I can and I try to continue learning, you know.

I do not know if this answer will be romantic enough, but that's the way things are.

What is your driving force?

I imagine you are referring to my main motivation when it comes to painting ... I always liked to draw characters, faces, in everyday scenes of life, but I can not deny that painting for me is a therapy, an exorcism, that helps me to express my doubts, confusions and paradoxes, and if possible, to denounce the falsity of this absurd society.

That's what I would really like, to say what I think without metaphysics, without excessive symbology ... I do not try to climb to the clouds and tell you fantastic stories about "my art"; what you see is what you get.

Sometimes I try to make fun of the mass, of those empty beings that roam the streets, of all that is conventional.

Other times I try to be a good guy and I paint things a little prettier.

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint many portraits lately, but they are invented characters and I improvise a lot. When I have some money to buy a canvas, I think more about what I'm going to paint, I draw sketches. I can not afford to waste a canvas and money... yes, it's a bit painful. Anyway, this does not improve the result, unfortunately. So I try to paint as long as possible during the day, which is why I have many more works on paper.

You know, if I had to wait for the inspiration to come ... I could not consider myself a painter.

I am learning many things about color, so my main job is to learn! I can not tell you much more about it.

I use oil to paint on the canvas, and when I paint on paper, I use gouache almost always. Sometimes, acrylic, but I do not like this type of material too much.

And well, with respect to the themes that I paint, I already told you in the previous question. For now I have not been able to focus on painting thematic series and that kind of things that people like to exhibit ... I only got to paint a series of paintings on paper with dark backgrounds that I called Dark Series. For the rest, mine is not more than shooting without aiming.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Until recently, I tried to paint images and memories of my childhood and youth, but for better or for worse, I have less and less memory. I thought I could capture a kind of autobiography in my work, but it is not always possible.

Most of my life I have lived in the north, and that marks you. Now everything has changed, but in my memories the sky was gray and there were small iron particles floating in it that came from the factories. Now I even live in a much sunnier part of the country, but when I paint, my mind flies like those metallic particles and again I am a child drawing in a notebook.

I really do not know if I am answering your questions correctly!

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

You can imagine the amount of interesting artists that never cease to amaze me. Now I mention Ron Throop, a passionate artista and enthusiastic colourist, an activist of the Stuckism movement with whom I identify myself. Great remarkable guy without a doubt: https://www.ronthroop.com

Nor can I fail to mention José Luis Micó, an intimate artist of refined style, full of feeling and great honesty who tries to break through in this strange world of art: https://dibujoslu.blogspot.com

What sometimes happens to us is that we do not know where to go, or when, to have a little recognition at least as artisans. 

Portraits by Clare Trevens.

Portraits by Clare Trevens.
An Interview with Clare Trevens.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Clare Trevens and I am a French artist who lives in Southern France (Provence).

What brought you to Art?

I discovered painting thanks to my grandmother who was a painter as well and who gave me my first paintbrush (in this way initiating the interest I developed afterwards in painting).

What is your driving force?

At this stage the driving force is no longer definable. My interest is to push further into the experiment and the unknown. It's like a will to find whatever you haven't found yet, a personal quest for something you know is there but still invisible at the moment.

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint people, portraits, faces. I can't resume myself to represent something else because I'm inexplicably drawn to it. A human being is complex enough in themselves to offer a wide range of emotions, contradictions and subtlety. I sometimes enjoy looking at a landscape painting or a still life, but I wouldn't paint this kind of subject. Human is enough for me.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I start with a vague idea of what I'd like to do, a creative concept I'd like to explore (like painting human puppets for instance). Then I work around this idea. The models are not really important, they are just an excuse to represent emotions. That's why I consider all of the portraits I make as self-portraits. They may not represent me but I know I transfused a bit of myself in them. Painting as a cathartic process is not a novelty.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

My favourite artists of the moment are Otero Carbonell and Henrik Uldalen, two major figurative painters. Their skills are no longer to be demonstrated anymore.

Expressionistic Portraits by William Stoehr.

Expressionistic Portraits by William Stoehr.
Misuzu 3 80x60 in.
An Interview with William Stoehr.

Who and where are you from?

William Stoehr from Boulder, Colorado, USA.

What brought you to Art?

In 1964 I was 16 years old and I wanted to be an artist. Willem de Kooning was my art hero but, the Vietnam War was raging, I couldn’t afford art school and I probably just didn’t know what I wanted to do. I became an engineer and ultimately president of National Geographic’s world-wide mapping businesses. 40 years later in 2004, I retired to become a full-time artist. I could afford to define success in my own way. It took a few years to find my voice – that which differentiates my work and specifies a moral foundation and vision.

What is your driving force?

For me, the essence of art is the exploration of fundamental issues of our time. I explore intolerance, discrimination, addiction and violence with its victims, witnesses and survivors. I believe that my job as an artist is to get you to think and to ask questions.

What kind of work you do and why?

I do large portraits – up to seven feet in height. They could be called expressionistic. Each portrait starts with an ambiguous expression, shared gaze and uncertain context calculated to provoke you into creating the narrative.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I begin with a live model and then work from reference photographs. I suggest certain features and realistically detail others. I use a limited pallet of acrylic paint along with metallic and iridescent colors that produce changing patterns with changes in lighting and view angle.

Working freely, I drip, brush, pour, scrub and scape paint while applying a variety of lines, dots and other adjustments. I often paint multi-views or facial features slightly out of alignment. I frequently paint vaguely different expressions for each side of the face. I look to cause changes in visual perception and emotional response. These variations might make my images appear more real as time, half remembered memories, and prior experiences affect your perception.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I am a big fan of Marlene Dumas. I like the expressive nature of her work. I like her method of letting the flows and drips guide her to a final image. She frequently employs a shared gaze. She pushes boundaries as she deals with subjects that some would consider controversial or unpleasant. Her art is in-your-face and gutsy.

Watercolor Artist Eugenia Gorbacheva from Russia.

Watercolor Artist Eugenia Gorbacheva from Russia.
An Interview with Eugenia Gorbacheva.

Who and where are you from? 

My name is Eugenia Gorbacheva and I'm watercolor artist. I live in Russia in a small and pretty city Zhukovsky.

What brought you to Art? 

My whole life was connected with art. As a child, I graduated from the fine arts school. I received a diploma in Russian State University named after AN Kosygin (Technology, Design, Art). 10 years worked as a fashion designer. But now I decided to devote myself to a completely watercolor painting.

What is your driving force? 

My driving force is my family. My little daughter inspires me every new day with her energy and vitality.

What kind of work you do and why? 

I love watercolor by its lightness, airiness, transparency. For it stubbornness, unpredictability. For the fact that he needs to tame and find a common language with it.

Tell us more about your thought process. 

I like to use bright colors in my paintings, but some landscapes require the use of more muted colors. 
When I paint, I focus on artwork as much as possible. At that moment, nothing can distract me.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Sergey Temerev This artist is just a magician when painting the sky.

Abstract Figurative's by Teresa Austin.

Abstract Figurative's by Teresa Austin.
An Interview with Teresa Austin.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Teresa Austin. I am from Ocean Beach, California.

What brought you to Art?

I remember being mesmerized by the stained glass art of the Saints as I grew up. Every day at Mass, I would stare at the artwork and drop into another world. I never forgot about that. I started my own art journey in  March of 2017 at the age of 54.

What is your driving force?

To simply create. Every day. That is my driving force.

What kind of work you do and why?

I love layering with gesso and acrylics. Over and over and over again.
I prefer the raw and unfinished aesthetic, as I believe that this is the playland of the Soul. 

Tell us more about your thought process.

I have no expectations when I create. This is pure exploration. It is creating something that comes from something bigger than myself.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I love Camille Claudel. I have been enchanted with her sculptures and her story as Rodin's inspiration to since I was a child. She was drawn to the intricacies of love and madness which I tend to find myself leaning towards in my art as well. 

Figuratives by Raúl Lara Naranjo from Spain.

Figuratives by Raúl Lara Naranjo from Spain.
An Interview with Raúl Lara Naranjo.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Raúl Lara Naranjo and from Spain.

What brought you to Art?

I believe art is in all of us, all children's in school draw and color, some of them stop doing it and others keep, I never stopped and that brought me into art slowly but surely.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is art itself and the possibility it gives me to express different thoughts and ideas through the canvas.

What kind of work you do and why?

I work  figurative and abstract paints, I need and use them both in different ways and to me they complement each other and join through the "body" of the canvas, the characteristic texture that I have developed.

Tell us more about your thought process.

As I said before I work figurative and abstract and I approach them in opposite ways. In my figurative work human being is the only thing it matters to me, in my recent works I try to represent what we are and others see but also the  side of ourselves that only we know, that idea can be extrapolated to the actual global society with all the social media and again what we really are and what we show through media and the contraposition between our "on and off line" lives. My abstract is inspired most of the times in nature, I just focus on colors and textures, I kind of feel more free  keeping apart all the philosophical side and just trying to focus on the aesthetic side of art.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I would say Miquel Barceló, I really love the colors he use and the textures almost all of his paints have, something (the texture) which is key in my work.

Portraits by Lo Chan-Peng from Chaiyi, Taiwan.

Portraits by Lo Chan-Peng from Chaiyi, Taiwan.
He said It has been finished, 162X130cm Oil on canvas 2018.
An Interview with Lo Chan-Peng.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Lo Chan-Peng and I’m from Chaiyi, Taiwan.

What brought you to Art?

I don’t actually know what bought me to Art, it has always been an instinct for me.

What is your driving force?

My passion for life. I want to express how I feel toward life though art.

What kind of work you do and why?

I want my art to improve with the history of men, adopting different techniques and aspects for my art.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Creating is like a passion to seek for the absolute truth. Even though it is not possible to find the answer via creating, yet we still learn from the process. The absolute truth is invisible, thus we cannot prove its existence. However, it is in our nature to seek for it, and the desire for knowledge is unpreventable. 
Aristotle has stated that everything in the universe follows the motion of nature,reiterating over and over again. The power that stimulates the movement is also what all creatures seek for in life. 
This is why we create. Creating may be the only truth among illusions. Just like the way men create life, it is a miracle but it is an absolute truth too.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Yu Siuan from Taiwan.
His works are full of inner strength, which this world lacks. They remind me of Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote. 

Art by Roberta Pizzorno.

Art by Roberta Pizzorno.
An Interview with Roberta Pizzorno.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Roberta Pizzorno, my roots are italian. 

My mother’s family is originally from Florence, the art nest of the world. 

I grew up in this eternal city. I studied languages in Switzerland and in reality I feel very much a citizen of the world. I lived in the Canary Islands, in Cairo, and then I moved in central Africa in Kenya, on the Indian Ocean.

What brought you to Art?

I remember the beautiful time spent with my granfather walking around Galleria degli Uffizi, in Florence one of the most important museum in the world and my grandfather’s favorite place. I was just a child and art entered in my world from the main entrance but at the age of 8 a terrible accident happened and my grandfather died, a part of me was froze and I did never draw again.

Around 35 years old,  after work and family, I decided to take care of the part of me that for some reason had been injured and damaged since childhood. I felt a strong need to draw but at the same time a terrifying fear was paralyzing me and did not let me pick up a pencil without having tachycardia.

What is your driving force?

I really wanted to transform that strong emotion of fear into a creative and constructive energy as the alchemical transmutation of lead into gold.

As I turned 20 years of classical and contemporary dance into yoga and daily meditation, I try to trasmute the fear into space of consciousness.

What kind of work you do and why?

In my artwork I tell stories that are not tied to states of being, they are not self-referential, they contain profound messages that become original for each of us. They are advisors for use. Nutrient instruction booklets for a broader, wider and a brighter view of who we really are. The drawings tell it to me and I translate it for all those who have time and space to look and see.

A sort of communication of symbolic, abstract or evocative images.

They can be extended and amplified visions of mankind, of human frailty and resources. They can be suggestions for new opportunities or better behaviors. The themes are very varied but they spiral around a single Fulcrum: The mystery of life.

I like using black ink to cover white spaces but I also love watercolors so sensitive and snappish.

Tell us more about your thought process.

My next exhibition is at Museo Arti Visive Palazzo Collicola in Spoleto Umbria Italy. Opening during the Festival of Two Worlds 30th June 2018, is titled “Full of Emptiness”.  It’s a state of mind or better a state of mindfullness that comes after many years of daily exercise. Not much to say, not much to think but just being fully present in the moment. Hic et nunc. Empty space of silence sound. The blank paper in front of me, no judgement, no expectations. I draw a little seed that start to be alive like a fertilized egg, winning more and more power from every breath I take. 

Sometimes it happens to witness epiphany fulminating events that redraw the meaning of a path. These are extraordinary moments in which even if I am the author, I become a spectator and for a while I disappear, leaving room for revelation.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

One artist? Only one? 
Chromaticism, composition, aesthetics, balance, creativity, technique, inspiration, harmony, intention, beauty … there are so many artists that embody these energies!

If I could only save one artist from the end of the world? Than it has to be Nicola de Maria: His skies, stars and flowers, love and colors… Impossible survive without them.

Figuratives by Chelsea Reede from USA.

Figurative art by Chelsea Reede a mixed-media artist from San Diego, California, USA.
A vision of the future.
An Interview with Chelsea Reede.

Who and where are you from?

I'm Chelsea Reede a mixed-media artist from San Diego, California, USA.

What brought you to Art?

It might sound strange but this art started to occur after a series of spiritual awakenings. I've been at it almost daily since early 2016.

What is your driving force?

I come to the art table with the desire to be amazed and am rarely disappointed.

What kind of work you do and why?

I work with acrylic paints, inks, paper collage, and charcoal, I like the quick drying time and how it all works together. My work is usually on paper of varying sizes, with an occasional canvas mixed in. 

Tell us more about your thought process.

I don't initially put much thought into the art, I spread some different colored paints around or mess with some charcoal and then start to notice images in that. Once I start to work with the characters I usually get a bit of a story that goes along with them. The stories are sometimes very moving, and they really bring the art to life.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I am really moved by Gillian Lee Smith, her work captures a mood that I find very inspiring, and her characters leave me wondering about their stories. 

Blythe Smith from Finland.

Blythe Smith from Finland.
An Interview with Blythe Smith.

Who and where are you from?

I’m Blythe Smith, a Finnish visual artist from Helsinki, Finland.

What brought you to Art?

Life-long urge and desire to make art and express myself.

What is your driving force?

The need to express myself, communicate my feelings and the things that are meaningful to me.

What kind of work you do and why?

I do painting, collages (of my own paintings only), videos, and comic strips.

Tell us more about your thought process.

My artmaking is based on intuition and material. I work on the basis of material and see what it turns into. I never make plans or sketches. I trust the process, it never fails me. Meanings only emerge while making art; therefore, I think that it’s useless to wait for inspiration.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Oh no, does it have to be just one? I’d like to name two: Eeva Peura, who was my teacher in art school.  

Henrik Fab, a great emerging Finnish artist and my fellow student from art school.

Figurative Paintings by Madeline Berger from France.

Figurative Paintings by Madeline Berger from France.
An Interview with Madeline Berger.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Madeline Berger, I come from France and live in Finistère in Brittany.

What brought you to Art?

Since very little I draw and I paint. I was not a brilliant student at school but my teachers discovered my artistic donor and they encouraged me a lot to continue. I continued my studies by integrating a school of graphic arts in Paris. Today I am artistic director in a communication agency. All my free time is used to paint without constraints and to express myself personally.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is to represent emotions often melancholy. For some years I strive to paint every day, to progress faster. I experiment new things non stop to open my creative horizon. I'm not very good with words and that's the only way I've found to express myself.

What kind of work you do and why?

My painting is often figurative but I try to enrich it with accidents. The technique of watercolor allows me precision but also a kind of abstraction thanks to the fluidity of this medium. I have a hard time translating my approach knowing that it evolves very quickly, I am looking for a lot and I am always looking for new horizons.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I love photography so I select pictures of portraits that touch me and I paint according to them. I try to appreciate the model and the change through different color schemes or materials.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

This is not an easy question, the real favorite of recent months is Paul Cristina. He is a crazy talent, his works are unique, very original and sensitive. It's really an artist to discover.

Paintings by Vito Stramaglia from Puglia, Italy.

Paintings by Vito Stramaglia from Puglia, Italy.
An Interview with Vito Stramaglia.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Vito Stramaglia, I was born and I live in Puglia, Italy

What brought you to Art?

In my life there has always been an inner voice that has brought me, since I was a child, to the complex world of art.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is the desire to put life in a canvas. life with its vibrations and its inexplicable simplicity

What kind of work you do and why?

My painting is very material and you can caress and feel almost a skin. I try to get to the beauty from all directions, using harmony but also vehemence, bright colors but also darker blacks. metaphor of life.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Good question. In my painting there is no thought and no rationality. everything comes from an idea while I'm far from the canvas and the colors. I sketch something on a small sheet and when I go to my studio I remain in silence and eyes closed in front of the canvas. when I hear the beating of my heart, I open my eyes and without thinking start painting.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

This is difficult for me. there are so many good artists and I can not say if one is more effective than another. my advice is to see all the art of the world without reading the names of the artists. art belongs to the universe, has no ego, and serves all of us to enter a dream.

Shan Fannin Realist Vehicle Painter.

Shan Fannin Realist Vehicle Painter.
An Interview with Shan Fannin.

Who and where are you from?

Shannon “Shan” Fannin (I go by Shan) Born in Long Beach, CA Living in Austin, TX.

What brought you to Art?

Art was a way for me to escape as a kid from a broken home. Even when life wasn’t cheerful, I could turn to art to get make it happier. In school, earned a college scholarship to become a special needs drawing teacher. I never finished a semester due to marriage, career in Marketing, and children. I took off 25yrs for career and family before I came back to art. Creating has always been a part of whom I am. I just had to wait for the right time in life to really make it important.

What is your driving force?

That almost sounds like a pun with what I create. LOL! Seriously, I think for me it is to break the stereotypes. The fact that I didn’t start on an art career until I was 44yo. That I’m a middle aged mom and woman that is creating paintings machines. Being a vehicle artist often puzzles people. I will often here “I thought you were a man” or “Have you thought of painting flowers, children, or landscapes?” I believe that women are finding their voice stronger than ever in the art world today. We are taking on issues that are political, social, economical, and non-conventional. When most people think of an artist, they usually think someone like Van Gogh, Warhol, or Michaelangelo. They don’t automatically think female. The same is true with vehicle artists. We think male. I want to change that. I want to prove that a female artist can love vehicles and depict them in a bold, interesting way. 

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint cars, motorcycles, and other vehicles on canvas with acrylics. My work has been categorized as Realism, but I see my work a little differently. I greatly enjoy painting with the palm of my hands or fingers. I paint with them for my backgrounds and some areas of reflections. That is why I like to work on large canvases. It allows me to paint with my hands. With my backgrounds abstract, I can bring out the brushes and create a realistic vehicle. I think that abstract background gives the eye a place to rest before taking in the complexity of a realistic vehicle. I consider my work 90% realism and 10% abstraction. 

As for why I paint vehicles for subjects, it is to share their beauty. To make us aware of what we take for granted. Most of us just see a tool that gets us to work, school, grocery shopping, or our kid’s soccer game. However, someone designed that headlight, fender, or bumper. A team of people created that engine. No matter if created to take the checkered flag at LeMans or take the dog to the vet, vehicles are important to us. They aren’t just appliances to me. They give a glimpse of whom we are. We put some of our personality into our vehicles. Fast, economical, flashy, vintage, modified, rusty, pinstriped, lowered, expensive, and more. They all tell the world a bit about ourselves. I like to capture that onto canvas. I want my collectors and viewers to enjoy these vehicles not only in their driveway, but on their walls. 

Tell us more about your thought process.

I don’t usually have a set vehicle in mind for my references. My husband and I attend car and motorcycle shows. WE go to F1 and dirt track races. We’ve been to England and Italy to photograph for future paintings. When I need to create a new piece, I will look through hundreds, if not thousands of photos for what I’m inspired by. 

Every now and then, I will see a car or motorcycle in our travels that I feel I NEED to paint. Something about the vehicle clicks with me and I know this will be a good painting. I love when that happens. It happens maybe 1-2x a year. When it happens, I feel like the painting almost paints itself. I’m just the observer holding the brush. It has happened with my Indian Scout, Mercedes AMG aka Red Pig, and my 1959 Cadillac Coupe deVille. 

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Wow! This is a hard question. First of all, I don’t follow other vehicle artists. Although I GREATLY admire so many, I don’t follow them on social media or their sites. I find that when I do, I start to question my own style and approach to work. I don’t want to copy someone else, but do my own thing. Instead, I follow a lot of figurative, landscape, still life, botanical, and abstract 2D artists. Each style has its own challenges, and I love to see how those artists tackle them. 

That being said, I enjoy when artists have a bit of an unexpected humor in their paintings. Life is so serious, and I admire tongue-in-cheek humor in art work. Honestly, I can’t narrow it down to one artist. However, I can give you four male artists that I absolutely adore with this style currently: Scott Listfield (Astronaut in a landscape series), Matthew Grabelsky (Animals on a subway series), Eric Joyner (Robots and donuts), and Robert C. Jackson (Balloons, toys, and food). Each of these artists has a quirky approach that makes me smile. 

As for female artists, I lean towards figurative artists that portray strong women in their works. I am not a figurative painter, and just love what these women create. Artists like: Erin Anderson, Andrea Kowch, Suzy Smith, Susannah Martin, and Mary Jane Ansell. These and many more women artists are setting an example for where the art world is going in the future. A world full of bold confidence and progressive thinking. It is an exciting time to be a creative.

Figurative Paintings by Judith Peck.

Figurative Paintings by Judith Peck.
An Interview with Judith Peck.

Who and where are you from?

I was born in the US in Brooklyn NY, grew up in New Jersey and have spent my whole adult life in and around Washington DC.  I consider myself an allegorical figurative artist.

What brought you to Art?

I have always been an artist.

What is your driving force?

I feel I have something to say and I feel that art gives me that voice.


What kind of work you do and why?

I am a painter-I think I have an affinity for paint and deep empathy for humanity.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I work all different ways, from jumping into a painting just knowing how a small piece of the work will be and then figuring out where it’s going- to seeing it all finished in my head and carrying it forward.  I love the creative process, burying or erasing parts of a painting, building other parts up and discovering magic.  I enjoy the struggle of creation.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I am in awe of Odd Nerdrum.  He paints more than an exterior shell of a person.  I feel he is always looking for the discovery, a true genius. I admire the obsession and passion he shows you when you see his work in person.

Portraits by Alexandra Dillon.

Portrait Paintings on unlikely objects by Alexandra Dillon from Los Angeles, California.
Artist Statement
If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a portrait is worth a thousand stories. My characters come to me the way a novelist's characters do: they form themselves through the creative process and tell me who they are. I strive to make each face unique and convey the life that that person has lived, solely through their look and expression.

In my current work, I paint on worn paintbrushes, many which have been donated by other artists. The faces are inspired by Roman mummy portraits, Old Master paintings, and any other source that speaks to me. Each face is unique and not a copy. These fun little paintings have the charm of hand mirrors, reflecting back our deepest selves.

Painting soft faces on the hard tools, like axes and cleavers, underscores our humanity. The intended purpose of each tool, juxtaposed with the portrait, alludes to inner motivations and social roles. The "old souls" on shovels, remind us of mortality and resurrection. Each of my personae has a set of dreams, disappointments, psychology and baggage. In other words, they are us.

An Interview with Alexandra Dillon.


Who and where are you from? 

I am Alexandra Dillon and I was born in Los Angeles, California.

What brought you to Art?

I started making art as a little girl and I never stopped!

How did you come up with the idea to do portraits on paintbrushes?

When a fire consumed the studio of a fellow artist, other artists were invited to make art from the burned remnants for a show. I took the burned paintbrushes. As soon as I painted a portrait on one brush, I knew I had created something special.

Where do you find your objects to paint on?

I comb through flea markets for old tools and other objects. The dresses come from the local thrift stores. Most of the paint brushes have either come from my own studio or have been donated by other artists.

How do come up with the portraits you create on paintbrushes?

I am a classically trained artist, and I can do actual portraits, but I prefer to let my imagination take the lead. My imagined portraits probably resemble people who have lived, now or sometime in the past. My characters come to me the way a novelist's do: they show up and tell me who they are. I don't begin with a fixed idea. As I work on each face, a personality emerges, and I try to imagine what kind of life they lead. They are all strong people who have resolve. I have always been interested in painting the human drama and I strive to make faces that convey a sense of the intelligence, desires and personality of that person. When the piece is done, they tell me their name.

What is your driving force? 

I  just have a need to create everyday.  Otherwise I would be bored.

What techniques do you use to make the art? 

I work in both oils and acrylics, sometimes both depending on my mood.

You call your style “psychological realism” What does that mean?

The psychology I refer to is both the psychology of the viewer and that of the characters I create. The intense gaze of the paintbrush portraits is engaging, and their shape is reminiscent of a hand-mirror. In that way, they become a reflection on self-hood. The tools, as I said are about hidden emotions.

What do you hope your audience will take away from your work?

I hope that people find my work to be provocative, amusing, beautiful and life-affirming. I like taking something that has already had one life and giving it a new one. All the rust, old paint, and other signs of its use, are like the scars we all bear, both psychologically and physically. They show a life that has been well-lived.

Tell us more about your thought process. 

I don't start with a fixed idea, I just start painting and the characters come to me.

What art inspires you?

I love art from all ages, especially the Roman-Egyptian mummy paintings, Baroque portraits, Renaissance and 19th century works. Aside from just loving the style of those paintings, old portraits show us that human beings are essentially the same as they have been for centuries. I like that continuity. And I adore very ancient art. One of my most cherished memories was visiting the cave paintings in Southern France. I am also inspired by outsider and folk art, which comes from such a pure place in the human soul.

Your work on axes, cleavers, locks, and other tools is beguiling. Can you tell us more about that?

AD: I think the juxtaposition of the face on the metal tools points to the unseen motivations of those personalities. Sometimes a pretty face is really hiding a sharp and aggressive emotion, or an eye reveals the feeling of being locked in relationship. It’s the combination of the tool’s intended purpose, plus the portrait that creates the meaning. I'm continuing to explore this area of my work.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why? 

There are so many incredible artists!!! I hate to choose. I like the paintings of  Ryan Mosley They are full of character.

Agnieszka Nienartowicz from Poland.

Portrait Paintings by Agnieszka Nienartowicz from Poland.
Adoration
An Interview with Agnieszka Nienartowicz.

Who and where are you from?

I am Agnieszka Nienartowicz and I'm from Poland.

What brought you to Art?

I have always had the need to speak. Painting turned out to be the best mean of expression for me. I am always amazed how many emotions, thoughts and feelings a painting can hide in itself and how strong can it speak to our soul, spirit and heart.  

What is your driving force?

I just have a need of painting. 

What kind of work you do and why?

My main interest is the human. All human beings, possessing physical and spiritual characteristics, are the living entities, in contrast to places and things, which are lifeless. This vibrating life, soul and spirit hidden in a flesh, pulls me in and makes a reason to penetrate their existence and nature. There is a duality in the human beings, that stretches between body and soul, physicality and psyche, life and death. I try to catch the self-mystery and intimacy in simple situations, gestures and glances, which all causes and specify us as the human beings. Often, I use attributes: objects, sceneries, paintings from the past centuries, which appear for me strange and peculiar in compelling and captivating way. I attempt to go deeply into the mind, to explore human's consciousness and what is happening internally. Intrigued by the moment of boundary between the real life and the painting, in realism I find the way to look at the world in detail and to exploration of perfectionism, clashing with myself and to contemplate in silence, detail after the detai, the complex painting tissue. 

Tell us more about your thought process.

My paintings are a result of my thoughts and reflections. I wonder how to translate a thought into an image. Then, I make drawings and invite a model to my studio to make a photosession. After this, I make projects - at this stage everything changes and very often it turns out, that my final project is completely different than primary one. And I start painting.

Portraits by Roman Gulman.

Portraits by Roman Gulman.
An Interview with Roman Gulman.

Who and where are you from?
My name is Roman Gulman. I’m originally from Kiev, Ukraine and I moved to Israel when I was 17.

What brought you to Art?
I have been drawing for as long as I can remember. My mom is an architecture engineer and my dad is an art enthusiast and both have always supported my passion for art. By the time I turned 13, my dad had noticed I am not interested in anything but art and has somehow managed to buy a book collection of all the major museums worldwide (Louvre, Versailles, Hermitage, Metropolitan, etc.) – an impossible achievement in the Soviet Union of that time. Shortly after, I started collecting stamps with famous art works of museums, renowned painters, art periods and movements. I would research, ask and trade my stamps with others, in order to complete my collection and as a result, my fascination with art has grown stronger. The images I saw in those stamps inspired me to learn more and continue drawing. In Israel, I enlisted to the “Ascola” High School of Design.

What is your driving force?
After school, I worked as art director on many fashion productions with the leading fashion brands in Israel. Collaborating with top fashion photographers and working with fashion sketches, I learned to look for that moment, that pause, when something deep from the model’s character, his/her personality, suddenly emerges and there is this spark that makes him/her look even better than in reality. 

It is that exact expression that I am trying to capture in my paintings today. This is the message I want to deliver.  

What kind of work you do and why?
My work focuses on portraits. On people. When I paint, I sometimes take my glasses off and see spots and blurs rather than nuances, trying to convey a certain feeling, mood or sensation. My goal is to extract that sincere emotion from within the person I’m painting. That’s why I focus on lines, light and shadows – the way they work together and the composition they create. I also usually add design elements in the background to enhance the character in the center.

In terms of style, you could say my work is influenced by Russian and French impressionists in the color pallet and expressive delivery using layers of paint.

Tell us more about your thought process.
I’ve been working in design for 20 years. 

During that time, I’ve accumulated a lot of experiences and memories. My mind is a collection of images, snap shots, frames, colors, faces, flashes and movie clips that constantly flicker in my head as inspiration. Slowly, I focus on a certain group and pick the image I am going to create. The goal is to deliver that image to a new medium of painting adding layers of expression and depth.

I find people to be the most interesting subject. The face. The changes in expression. Those little movements that render the face completely different.

My strength is in color. When I paint, I feel like I enter a state of trance. I sit close to the canvas and focus to feel the perspective, first drawing without glasses and doing the final accurate additions at the end.
When it feels right, my endorphins run wild. I get nervous and excited like a teenager waiting for a date, with butterflies in my stomach. 

The world of canvas is often too polite to fully express what I feel, so I often also use pastels and graffiti spray to convey my emotions.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?
There are a few modern painters who influence my work. I’ll mention these four:

The Austrian impressionist Egon Schiele – and how he grasps lines, distortions, sexuality. How he deforms his characters, drawing “incorrectly” but it feels so right.

Dominik Jasinski from Poland, and the way he captures faces and uses colors.

Ryan Hewett from South Africa and the way he uses stains.

And the Canadian Andrew Salgado and his colorful technique – also placing the person in front.

Portraits by Enes Debran from Istanbul Turkey.

Portraits by Enes Debran from Istanbul Turkey.
An Interview with Enes Debran.

Who and where are you from?
I am Enes Debran from Istanbul Turkey.

What brought you to Art?
Productivity and the urge to create something of my own first set me on a search and i found the answers in art. In this process i wanted to get away from the chaos that life brings and create a world where i set the rules and listen to the voice of my soul and subconscious.

What is your driving force?
Being an introvert and closing my doors to the outer world and the pleasure i take from 
standing next to a piece of art i created and watching it is what drives me to work.

What kind of work you do and why?
I usually work around portraits because i think it is the clearest thing in which mankind gives away emotions and reflects what is inside.

Tell us more about your thought process.
I don’t really think much before painting. It all starts when i am in front of the canvas. When the absolute submission is ensured, process goes by itself naturally. It wouldn’t be wrong to describe myself as an expressionist. I don’t manipulate the process by following the rules. While fulfilling what the painting demands of me i also try to involve my soul and satisfy its needs too. Only then i can crack the wall between me and the painting and create works of arts that represent me wholly and sincerely.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?
Van Gogh deeply interests me. I think there aren’t many artists who can express themselves in a such transparent way.

Rogowoi Artem a Painter from Ukraine.

An Interview with Rogowoi Artem.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Rogowoi Artem I’m painter from Kharkov region in Ukraine.

What brought you to Art?

Honestly I don’t remember why started to practice art, because it was many years ago and in different periods cause was be different. The first step was be art school, then art college and the finish my learners way was be Kharkov Academy Design and Arts where I was learn restoration of painting. It was important for my life, because I learned painting technology and something technical like fresco and others.So, it’s my metier and I love what I do. 

What is your driving force?

I try to do something what not enough in this world for me. 

What kind of work you do and why?

I mixer few styles of painting and try to create the most beautiful artistic images based on the experience of previous generations of artists and my observations of natural textures and elements. But it’s hard for me, I mean to talk about my paintings because I’m constantly dissatisfied with the results and I want to improve.