Paintings by Clive Bryant from UK.

Paintings by Clive Bryant from UK.
Modern Icons - Amy Winehouse.
An Interview with Clive Bryant.

Who and where are you from?

I am Clive Bryant from the UK.

How you got into this?

Although I studied art at school and went on to have a short music career, I soon became wrapped up in electronics and computing, and the need to earn a living from a “proper job”. I was involved in the tech and internet boom of the 1990s and early 2000s but I returned to more creative areas when I started Classical Comics, an educational graphic novel publishing company in 2007. That got me back into drawing, and when my involvement with that business had run its course, I moved on to fine art painting, particularly in oil. I’ve always had a lucky knack for seeking out information when I need it – maybe it’s the stars aligning on the astral plane! – and I’ve been fortunate enough to receive some wonderful and timely tuition in various workshops and courses both here in the UK and in the US.

What is your driving force?

I love psychology. Humans are so intricate and complicated. While part of that mystery is revealed when we get to know someone better, we can never know anyone completely. Not even ourselves. There are things about us all that remain hidden. No one knows their capacity to act in any certain way, or how they would react in an extreme situation. That concept fascinates me. Hidden depths – parts of us that are sheltered by the mask of society, or the mask of celebrity. How the roles we adopt enforce a certain way of behaving; how celebrity status can bring about misery and tragedy, and yet how people still crave it! Having a creative outlet for these thoughts is really important to me. I feel the need to capture the human condition.

What kind of work you do and why?

It pleases me to create work that operates on more than one level. The psychological aspects I talk about above run through my art, but the pieces also work on a more surface‐level. At least that’s what I aim to achieve.

Modern Icons

Celebrities are worshipped by millions around the world and I see a similarity between that and medieval religious works, which I link through the use of gold leaf. At the same time, I look to portray the person behind the mask of celebrity, revealed through quotations, different facial personas and associated symbolic elements (flags, objects, etc). All the subjects carry a sadness and a strong element of tragedy, which I believe is due to them being “ordinary” people who have used their talent to become “extraordinary”, thereby alienating themselves from their own humanity. Like religious icon paintings, they become a symbol of something instead of being themselves. The role, rather than the human.

Burlesque

These are great fun to paint! Really interesting shapes and poses, with entertaining colour splashes, lost edges, and paint action. It’s psychologically fascinating too. As with the Modern Icons, we see ordinary people deciding to become a different persona and using their talent to become what? Significant? Noticed? Famous? Or to express themselves artistically? They create a mask that they can hide behind, which might be to protect their vulnerable selves, or might be so that they can carry out their actions, like camouflage. There is a duality, just as their names are plays on words. And I encourage the similarity between how they look and the art that adorned US war planes in the 1940s. Femme fatale. Overall, as in Burlesque performances, these pieces are in praise of the female form.

Contemporary Portraits, or The Dark Reveal

I’ve only just moved on to these, but it’s a continuation of the above, concerned with how we only ever reveal part of ourselves; that a good deal remains hidden and “in the dark”. Despite not being visible, the viewer knows the rest of the person is there, and by completing the visual is thereby more closely linked to the subject. I want the viewer to be intrigued by what is not visible, just as I am – and that is a thread that runs through Modern Icons and Burlesque. In a way, I’m trying to paint what isn’t visible – to take the viewing experience beyond the canvas and the immediately visible.

Paintings by James Bonnici from Australia.

Paintings by James Bonnici from Australia.
'Self Portrait in Bathroom' , oil on canvas, 26cm x 26cm, 2011.
An Interview with James Bonnici.


Who and where are you from?

My name is James Bonnici and I live and work in Melbourne, Australia.

How you got into this?

My dad was a hobby painter and as early as I can remember, I would sit and watch him paint. So I guess being exposed to the idea of painting as a young child, making art seemed like a normal thing to do.

What is your driving force?

I'm always drawn to an image first; something that is evocative enough and has a sense of ambiguity or strangeness, that it stays in the mind for days, that I need to translate it to paint or charcoal to bring it to life.

What kind of work you do and why?

I always work in the medium of oil painting or drawing. I like the history and evolution behind these two processes, in particular their relationship with figurative realism, and to see if I can add anything interesting to it. The imagery I choose goes through a process of obscuring, distorting and manipulating of reality to invoke a sense of rupture, challenging the representation of the physical world, hinting at the more ambiguous nature of being and existence.

Portraits Ecuador by Christian Mera.

Portraits Ecuador by Christian Mera.
Bonil
An Interview with Christian Mera.

Who and where are you from?

People call me Christian Mera. I am 37 years old and I pursuit find my essence between painting and the gaze of whom I paint. I graduated from Bachelor of Fine Arts and obtained the specialization in pintura-grabado in 2009.

I was born in Quito - Ecuador, but I also inherited chilean nationality from my grand mother. Since the moment I got the double nationality and stared moving around the world, I decided to don´t be attache to a flag or a “patriotic” spirit. I decided being a world citizen.

How you got into this?

It started up little by little. Every decision and circumstances have irredeemably built me as a painter. Right now I live from and for them. I feel my studio is my place in the world, and everything I do outside of it is, on different leves, a waist of time. The moments I regret and doubt about what I should do or who I am are far behind.

What is your driving force?

There is a repetitive anecdote of unsuccessful searches for the Abstract in my personal story. I don`t think it is a whim, it´s the conviction that the color and the shape should be expressed alone, without figures, positions or any approach that comes out of the field of vibration that should cause the chromatic frequencies or tensions in the way on a 2D surface (explicitly talking about the pictorial).

For my painting should be enjoyed as is a Symphony: without lyric or plot, only perceiving the frequencies and having a pure sensory experience.

I have yet to find my own way of abstracting. My work is suspended in an attempt to, in a pursuit. I start painting my free signatures on paper, leaving me lead by the "non-form" and suddenly faces start to appear; but I respect them and give them space in my compositions. The primary impulse and intuition are key parts for me. I've decided to move softly in this hybrid space.

What kind of work you do and why?

I do signatures.

The signature, the stamp of each individual.

The "Signature" serie was born when I realized that my eternal hunt to get this Abstract was more simple than I thought. First; I should stop fighting and always paddling against the current. Second; I noticed that one of the most common acts of nowadays western people, signing a document, hide the transcendental key to forever change my line.

Sign is an intentional impulse to move the hand and be entirely authentic. Therefore; I have held for some years the thesis that anyone could paint a picture that is "authentic". Speaking purely in terms of individual expression, regardless of the topic or much less “contemporaneity”.

In the serie "signatures" experiment with expanding this tiny moment of signing our personal doodle in a document; extending it in time and space to the whole painting.

Paintings by Philippe Attie from Haiti.

Paintings by Philippe Attie from Florida.
Desire.oil on canvas.67''x55''.2015
An Interview with Philippe Attie.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Philippe AttiĆ©,  I was born and raised in Haiti now I live in Florida.

How you got into this?

I can't really remember exactly when I decided to be an artist, for some reasons my family always knew what I was going to do in life. I started do paint around 11 years old.

What is your driving force?

My goal is to communicate complex emotions through my work and visually express passions and desires.

What kind of work you do and why?

As an aspiring visual artist, I strive to capture facets of the human soul through a fusion of realism and a diffused abstract style. Defined by sensuality, wisdom, and the wonderful, my work inspires lightness in the subjects and their movements.While I mostly work with acrylic and oil on canvas, I occasionally experiment with painting on wood or aluminum panels to enhance the structure of my creations. My subjects include nude models and a vast array of objects. The transparency of my work is a blended form of precise realism and elements of spontaneity expressed through gestural freedom.

Portrait Paintings by Richard Greathouse from Italy.

Portrait Paintings by Richard Greathouse from Italy.
Camilla II
An Interview with Richard Greathouse.


Who and where are you from?

I grew up in Nashville, Tennessee, and after spending some time in university studying architecture, I decided to dedicate myself to painting, and moved to Florence, Italy, where I currently reside. Both of my grandfathers had artistic inclinations which they pursued in their free time, and my family has been incredibly supportive of my decision to pursue a life as an artist. 


How you got into this?

I was always attracted to drawing, and in my teens I discovered the wonders of paint. When I decided to follow its path, I knew I needed proper training, so I enrolled in the Florence Academy of Art in Florence, Italy. My time in school there opened up a much wider world than I knew previously, and after graduating, I stayed on as teacher. I am currently teaching drawing and painting as well as artistic anatomy, when I am not working on my own work. 

What is your driving force?

Selfishly speaking, I see my time in front of the easel as a sort of sacred space in which I can both meditate and revel in the nature of whatever I’m painting. The best moments are those in which there is nothing between myself and the subject; the true nature, or “is-ness”, of the subject reveals itself, and the external world washes away. The great works from the past, in my opinion, are products of this “state of doing,” and I am fascinated by how the physical properties of the paint itself can encapsulate some hint of these states. In that way, a painting can be a record of these profound moments - beautiful in its own way, and beautiful in what it represents. Therein lies the flip side of the selfish act, because I truly believe that great art can move people to appreciate more the world around them, if the artist was able to appreciate it fully him or herself. We live in a beautiful and mysterious world, and a more widely spread appreciation could make it an even better place. 

What kind of work you do and why?

Lately I have focused primarily on portraits. I find that when placed in front of another living being, and having to study them carefully and with intention, a confrontation with the profundity and mystery of existence is almost inevitable. By being in the presence of another person’s “is-ness,” I find myself (sometimes uncomfortably) more keenly aware of my own. It is both exciting and challenging. I think the same experiences can come from working from any subject, but I have found personally that it is easier for me to gain access to this state when working with another person, from life.

Figurative Paintings by Kendric Tonn from America.

Figurative Paintings by Kendric Tonn from America.
Male Nude in Studio Interior (Composition in Triangles, oil on canvas, 40 x 48in.
An Interview with Kendric Tonn.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Kendric Tonn. I'm currently based in Columbus, Ohio, though I've moved around quite a lot. I'm an oil painter, trained at SCAD and the Florence Academy of Art.

How did you get into painting?

I was never really one of the Art Kids in school, but I found myself starting to draw seriously in late high school and early college. After I finished my undergraduate, I was working in Japan, found myself drawing constantly, and thought, well, maybe I should take this seriously.

What is your driving force?

Painting is, obviously, a visual medium, and I've always been a visual person.  In some ways, I started drawing as a means of looking, and that's an important part of my practice--looking, seeing, and expressing.  I also work extensively with the figure, and the human connection you form doing that is really something that's crucial to me.

What kind of work you do and why?

I'm a highly representational oil painter, working mainly with the nude figure, though I also paint still-lifes regularly. I'm interested in the expression of form and the creation of visual patterning across the 2D plane of the painting. My work, particularly with the model, is also highly driven by the attempt to create a kind of three-way emotional sympathy, between the model, the artist, and the viewer. I hope to express a sense of human presence, of a specific soul embedded in a body.

Paintings by Amanda Greive from America.

Paintings by Amanda Greive from America.
Requiem for the Obedient.
An Interview with Amanda Greive.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Amanda Greive and I am from central Illinois.  I studied art at the University of Illinois in Springfield.

How you got into this?

Though I come from a family that is very musically and artistically inclined, I originally went to school to become an epidemiologist.  After graduating from school, I took a job but still felt unfulfilled.  A little over 10 years ago, I decided to take a drawing class at my local community college and instantly felt that making art was what I was meant to do and I've been doing it ever since.

What is your driving force?

I have always been interested in the human condition--why we feel the way we do, how we address and cope with feelings of loneliness and isolation.  I'm also interested in how this concept intersects notions of gender equality and stereotypes inherent in gender.

What kind of work you do and why?

In my art-making process, the portrayal of relationships symbolically through the interplay of objects and the female figure has been a priority. I have found that traditional representation has, thus far, best suited me in my exploration of this topic, and my imagery references both classical and contemporary symbolism and iconography. While my paintings are singular to my own experiences, it is my hope that they also have a universality to them, wherein the viewer is able to relate his or her own relationships to the portrayals, making the act of viewing the painting an experience in its own right. As such, this body of work serves as an exploration of the human condition, that irreducible part of humanity that connects all of us.  We all inherently have a propensity to search for purpose, a sense of curiosity, a desire to be loved and to give love, an acute acknowledgement of the inevitability of isolation, and a fear of death.

The primary motivation behind my work is to tease out the nuanced emotions embedded within the human condition and to confront isolation and anxiety born of gender-based stereotypes.  The floral element of each painting symbolically draws attention to femininity as a source of possible societal, emotional and personal conflict for the figures portrayed. Too, each work is painted photorealistically, so instinctively there is an emphasis on technique. I look to comment on the contradiction between creating realistic imagery and portraying emotional rawness, as well as the uncompromised truth in the imagery portrayed versus its symbolic ambiguity.

Figurative Paintings by Marina from Russia.

Figurative Paintings by Marina from Russia.
An Interview with Marina Marina.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Marina, I'm a professional artist. I live in Russia in a very beautiful city - St. Petersburg, this city is also called the northern capital or "northern Venice".

How you got into this?

As a child, I painted well, but I did not intend to associate my life with drawing.

I wanted to be a lawyer, but for financial reasons, I could not go to law school right after graduation (he was in another city, and I lived with my mother and sister in a small town in Kostroma).
I go to work. 

One day at a party, my friends and I started talking about art education, and I argued with my friend that I would go to the art and graphic faculty, despite the fact that I had not previously learned to paint anywhere else.
And I did it))))

It was unreasonable, but that dispute was heard by many of my friends and my pride did not allow me to give up my words))))
And I liked to paint.

What is my driving force?

Probably stubborn (this is when something does not work), but in general I just really like being an artist.

What kind of work you do and why?

I turned to various topics during my artistic career. Now I write beautiful girls. It's beautiful and interesting.

I hire a model and think out an image for it, I look for entourage and attract a make-up artist and hairdresser .... I build a composition and only then I start painting a picture.

I took part in art exhibitions in Russia, then my paintings were sold at auctions in London (auctions Christie and Bonhams). And now American amateurs of painting can see my pictures and, if they like, buy.

Figurative Paintings by Vicki Sullivan from Australia.

Figurative Paintings by Vicki Sullivan from Australia.
Waiting in the Old China cafe - Oil on linen - H120cm x W90cm.
An Interview with Vicki Sullivan.

Who and where are you from?

I grew up in Sorrento, a small seaside town on the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria Australia .

How you got into this?

My grandmother painted and always encouraged us grandchildren in our creative pursuits. Her motto was if a child is interested in something foster it. I was always most drawn to the realist paintings I saw, and really longed to learn how to paint like that? It seemed like magic to be able to paint something so well.

My longing to learn traditional old master methods led me on a search to find teachers who were skilled enough to teach the traditional painting skills. 

When I was young I studied at Frankston Technical College, now Chislolm which was a wonderful basis for learning about lots of different art mediums. I went on to University but realism was discouraged because it was unfashionable so it took me a long time to find teachers who could teach the knowledge which I longed for. I found private painting teachers Brian Armstrong and Fiona Bilbrough who set me on the right path to realism. 

My artistic journey led all the way to Florence Italy where I was able to spend some time studying at the Angel Academy of Art with Maestro Michael John Angel. It was the most amazing experience learning the methods of the Old Master which are still taught in Italy. Drawing from the life model every day drawing long pose academic drawings of the model in 3 hour sessions for 27 hours really helped my observation skills.

The course also covered anatomy, composition, colour theory, Art history and many other useful subjects. Skill is highly valued at the Angel Academy of Art and several Art Academies which teach figurative realism are based in Florence, all teaching to an extremely high standard. There are sadly very few places in Australia which teach similar methods, except for the Julian Ashton school in Sydney which has been around since 1890.

What is your driving force?

It is hard to explain my driving force but I suppose it is a striving for excellence, I know there is so much more to learn and I want to improve my skill base so I am able to paint the subjects I want really well. 

I do have a strong work ethic, you really have to put in the hours and train your eye to improve your work so I get up and work every day at least six days a week.

What kind of work you do and why?

I like figurative painting, so people are my main subject. I often like to invite my subject for lunch and I try to have at least two sittings with them. That way I can get to know them a little in a relaxed way, eating lunch is always a great atmosphere to unwind and also gives me the time to study the structure of the head, skin tones and the character in the hands.

Having lunch is also a way to get to know the personality of the sitter and get ideas for a pose or gesture for the painting. I like to discuss my ideas for the painting as well and make sure the subject is comfortable with it too.

I like my Portraits to look as if the person could walk straight out of the painting and into the room so acute observation is important, to make the painting look like the person. Also I like to create a narrative in the painting by using objects or clothing which may relate to something in the person’s life which tells a story or adds detail about them.

I absolutely love creating something from scratch and then the moment comes when you start really Getting the essence of a person, they start evolving out of the canvas and it is a very moving moment for me. Also the moment when the subject and their family come to see the finished painting is really wonderful, I have had quite a few family members cry tears of joy.
I feel so lucky to do the work I do.

Figurative Art by Sharon Knettell from New England.

Figurative Art by Sharon Knettell from New England.
Alica Blue
An Interview with Sharon Knettell.

Who and where are you from?

I am originally from Windsor Connecticut USA, I went to art school in Boston at the Boston Museum School of  Fine Art. I moved to Rhode Island after school and have been here ever since. I am a New Englander through and through.

How you got into this?

I have never been out. I started drawing as soon as I could hold a pencil. My first important work was a drawing of a soda bottle with a straw called "Pepsi, not being Drunk" - I was four.

What is your driving force?

Painting is one of the most difficult things to do with even marginal competence.  It is completely challenging and frustrating simultaneously. I have not found anything else as absorbing.

What kind of work you do and why?

It is totally figurative. I really am not interested in anything else other than color. It is the most difficult to make a figure breath and talk back to you. I have done two still-lifes in my life and no landscapes.Color is a co-equal element, I see the painting in my mind's eyes as an exploration of a color idea, will it be monochromatic, or complementary or a painting exploring double complementaries?  Klimt and Degas could pull off the most complicated color harmonies,. Other than general idea scribbles, I generally start out with color, a bit of fabric, color-aid paper and scraps of ribbon or other colored bits of stuff and pin them on things. The picture then as a whole comes into my head and I try to recreate it. My paintings are close to life sized- there is a really visceral feel to painting something, say, an arm in that scale.

My pictures are not psychological portraits of the sitters, I look at the way they sit, the way the light hits them, the angle of the head and how the pose is arranged within the framework of the picture plane, the design. I move them around until I get what I want. Jung I am not! . It takes me quite a bit of time to plan a painting right down to the chair or flowers etc. I love costumes, I have them made for my paintings, including wigs and dyed shoes if necessary. I taught fashion illustration in the apparel design department of the Rhode Island School of design. One of my students was into corsets- I fell in love with them as well, I love the shape they make and they help keep a sitter upright! I am drawn to beautiful, well crafted, thoughtful and sometimes irreverent work. I like to take traditional atelier techniques like sight-size and trois crayons on handmade tinted paper to make drawings of models in anime costumes. They are from life, but the costumes are not traditional. It is more fun for me. 

Manet is my favorite painter, using inspiration from Japanese prints he turned the figures toward the light (eg Olympia) and flattened the picture plane. This freed the picture plane from the heavy chiaroscuro of the French academic painting and allowed for more play in color, pattern  and design. That alone was genius.

Paintings by Dimitris Angelopoulos from Greece.

Paintings by Dimitris Angelopoulos from Greece.
Inside Out , oil on canvas , 150 x 120 cm.
An Interview with Dimitris Angelopoulos.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Dimitris Angelopoulos and I am an artist from Greece. I was born in 1994 in Athens where I live and work.  I graduated from my school of art in 2017. My work belongs to private collections in Greece and abroad.

How you got into this?

I have recently discovered that I have a feel for  painting and since then I have been painting systematically and daily and I will continue. I improve myself in every work and observe my evolution through my work. I studied at  Vellios School of Art in the Fine Arts section with professor A. Pistonis, who is the one who incorporated me in all of this and helped me  improve as a painter and as a person.

What is your driving force?

The things that usually affect me to paint are human, the portrait. Through it I see emotions and images. There are also other personal moments - feelings that I have experienced and have within myself and I want to impress and say. It is a way of liberating and seeing things differently. Usually they are experiential from my life and a reflection of myself.

What kind of work you do and why?

My painting  is anthropocentric - illustrative(pictoreal) with emphasis on portrait and hands which in my opinion plays a big part in the dramaticness of a work. Through my painting I can express a piece of myself or a piece of how I want to be. Usually my works are experiential and based on my feelings as a great calendar for my life. I try to do what I like and through it to tell a story. I identify with my models so my projects get an emotional bond. My models are always close to me and important to me. Through my painting I often discover important things about my own life and release and express myself.

Paintings by Achilleas Pistonis from Greece.

Paintings by Achilleas Pistonis from Greece.
Under Constant Influence 130x230 cm oil on canvas.
An Interview with Achilleas Pistonis.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Achilleas Pistonis, I am a painter and I am from Greece.

How you got into this?

I started painting from a very young age. I studied at Athens School of Fine Arts under the guidance of Triantafillos Patraskidis. After my graduation, I worked with Frissira’s Museum, one of the few museums of contemporary painting in Greece.
Since then I have held 2 solo exhibitions as well I have participated in over 30 group exhibitions in Greece and abroad. In 2016 I have participated in 5 Art Fairs with Kaplanon galleries (Madrid, Barcelona, Zurich, Athens and Thessaloniki).

What is your driving force?

My work starts from personal references and experiences and they end up raising a point on wider issues of society, as I understand them. 
Through my own people (family, friends) I have directed a lot sections of paintings regarding mourning or depression, but also I have created paintings for novels, poems or the cover of a cd.

What kind of work you do and why?

My work is symbolistic and figurative painting. I can’t really answer why. All I know is that I only do what makes me feel complete and I don’t see any reason why I should do anything else. As long as there are things that I still want to do, I will continue doing them. 

Paintings by Lauren Tilden from New Jersey.

Paintings by Lauren Tilden from New Jersey.
Baptism
An Interview with Lauren Tilden.


Who and where are you from?

My name is Lauren Tilden. I am from New Jersey. I studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and the University of Delaware. My work is represented by Haynes Galleries in Tennessee and Maine, and F.A.N. Gallery in Philadelphia, PA.

How you got into this?

My parents are both artists and from an early age I was surrounded by art and weekly trips to the art museum. As a child I loved to draw and always knew painting was what I was designed to do. I was greatly influenced by the work of Wyeth and Eakins.


What is your driving force?

My awe at the created world and a search for the Creator.


What kind of work you do and why?

I am a figurative artist working primarily in oil on panel. But occasionally I will do egg tempera painting. I paint portraits and figures in the landscape. Both the human figure and the sublime landscape are the vehicles I use for exploring the tension between the corporeal and spiritual; the place where God reaches his hand to Adam. My paintings prioritize the depiction of light which creates the illusion of three dimensional form. This foundation allows for exploration in narratives surrounding the concept of man¹s relationship to God.Together my paintings depict the tension between devastation and the possibility of renewal.

Paintings by Robert Carter from Canada.

Rule The Roost
An Interview with Robert Carter.


Who and where are you from?

Born in St. Albans, England, I moved to Ontario, Canada, at an early age.  Eventually I went on to study Art and Illustration, graduating from the prestigious Sheridan College School of Art and Animation. I've been a full time working professional illustrator for roughly 15 years, winning multiple awards along the way. Combining a strong foundation in portraiture with a unique sense of visual and conceptual problem-solving I aim to create striking, vibrant, and textured illustrations and portraits with subjects ranging from the realistic to the surreal. With a background in traditional oil painting I applied those skills to the digital realm and taught myself the digital painting medium, which is now my preferred method of working for it’s speed and flexibility.


How you got into this?

I’ve always wanted to be an illustrator, since I was a wee lad. I grew up on comics and later discovered the work of Norman Rockwell and was mesmerized. Eventually I graduated from Sheridan College studying interpretive illustration. I've been a full time freelance illustrator now for almost 15 years.


What kind of work you do and why?

I mainly do editorial work as well a lot of portraiture for magazines and newspapers. I’d love however to break into doing more fictional book cover work. I do what I do because its like having an itch you’re compelled to scratch.

Paintings by Diogenis Papadopoulos from Greece.

Paintings by Diogenis Papadopoulos from Greece.
An Interview with Diogenis Papadopoulos.

Who and where are you from?

I live in Xanthi, a small town in Greece. I studied Civil Engineering and currently I am a student in the School of Architecture. 

How you got into this?

In terms of my relationship with painting, I can not track a specific period as I have always drawn. It is just that at times there is a greater need for expression.My interest in comic books was the first contact with art and triggered me to discover other painting movements such as pop art, surrealism, expressionism.

What is your driving force?

Everything revolves around man. From face to body movements. Sometimes the source of my inspiration is either a familiar face (the way one is standing, reading, reclining), or a photo, or even part of it. Also, my inspirations come from moments, landscapes, people,  and I try to reproduce the moment, the expression, the smells that impressed me, but what matters is always the color.

What kind of work you do and why?

Painting is a dialogue with myself. It helps to find a balance in life. It is a stress buster, so I create the conditions to draw. I experiment with different painting materials such as  ink, acrylic, oil,  tempera on paper or canvas, but I am fascinated by ink and oil paints.

Abstract Expressionism by David Stegmann.

Abstract Expressionism by David Stegmann.
An Interview with David Stegmann.

Who and from where are you?

My Name is David Stegmann, I'm living and working in Staufen (South Germany). This area is culturally interesting as it is close to the French and Swiss boarder and various influences have created a buzzing new scene here.

How you got into this?

My father was a sculptor, he educated me in drawing, modelling and sculpting but my personal interest was and still is to paint. I started as early as 13 with street art and got subsequently recognized by galleries and other artists. I had my first street art exhibition when I was 24. After various exhibitions my expression changed from classic street art towards more contemporary, abstract painting. Since then I have been focusing on identifying my own abstract style. Currently I am trying to transform abstract landscapes into more focused work of a specific detail I find important. This transformation has been very rewarding for me as it gives me a new look upon my way of expression. 

What is your driving force?

The driving force behind my work is the urge to get my thoughts on canvas. I always loved to paint and by now it´s an uncontrollable energy which brings me back to the studio every day. Finding new ways to express myself and the idea to focus on details and creating them in a new way is very fulfilling. To get closer to creating something close to the perfection of nature is an ultimate goal. 


What kind of work you do and why?

I would call my work modern, abstract expressionism. In my head most pictures are already set and day by day I get closer to the image in my head until I can call it finished. It's a journey which takes sometimes weeks to get there.
I paint a lot with oil and acrylic lacquer or just acrylic paint on canvas, wood or paper. I really love to work very pastose as it ads a specific soul to my paintings and I love the extra dimension. 

Hyperrealistic Paintings by Ania Wypych from Poland.

Hyperrealistic Paintings by Ania Wypych from Poland.
Black and white play” Boson 2, oil on canvas 100/70cm 39,5/27,5 in 2017 http://annawypych.pl/?p=1492
An Interview with Ania Wypych.

Who and where are you from?

I'm artist, mom, wife. I life in Gdynia city on the coast of Baltic sea, Poland.

How you got into this?

Naturally. Started when I was a child, then high school with fine art profile, then Academy of art. I always knew that this makes me happy, I got lucky to have understanding parents, and got some good advices from people I met on my way. So it was my natural develop, when I was becoming  more mature, I automatically was more deep in "art". Of course there were some of moments when I had to make difficult decision, or take a risk, put everything on one card. I always was and am very ambitious and hard working. So in my case it was a process and it is still working on. 

What is your driving force?

I am workaholic. Sometimes I have to explain myself if front of myself that I need to rest. He he he. My art is a side effect of how I am feeling emotions and perceive the world. I think that it is more like a way of life, no something additional what needs separated source of energy. 


What kind of work you do and why?

I am deep in hyperrealism, but I can not stop myself from adding surrealistic elements to my works. I chose this kinds of means of art because of my character, I like work long on project, I like when it grows slowly, and is very detailed. 

My art was always connected with thinking about something, working on topic, problem. In the past it was textes with stories, which complemented my paintings. Lately it developed into poems, they are really important part of my works, so check out on my web poem I wrote to painting you like.

Oil Portraits by Chaz Williams from Cape Town.

Oil Portraits by Chaz Williams from Cape Town.
An Interview with Chaz Williams.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Chaz Williams, I am a Cape Town based artist. 

What type of artist are you? 

I’m not really sure haha. I don’t think I classically fit in anywhere.


How you got into this?

I have always been into art. How I became an active selling professional artist was when I entered a local portrait competition in Cape Town. I did a little sketch of Nelson Mandela and it ended up being sold for a decent price. That was the beginning for me. The sketching was so much fun and the selling of the piece was just the affirmation I needed.


What is your driving force?

My driving force is two-fold. The one side of my art passion is charity. I give 50% of all my auctioned pieces to charity and charity events. As a South African it is very important to give back and to help. I have now raised over half a million Rand for various charities through my art.

The second driving force behind my art is my perception of art. I feel I have something to say in art. I want to create big, bold, beautiful, powerful, emotive work. Work that can really make an impact. Art has the power to do so much and express so much. I want to explore that…


What kind of work you do and why?

My work will always be large and emotive. I predominantly only paint oil portraits. In all my pieces, I have tried to connect with the viewer, in hope that it evokes a sense of emotion. I use pallet knives, brushes, mediums, spray paint etc. Anything that helps me get to where I want the piece to be.

Portrait and Figurative Paintings by Bergthor Morthens.

Portrait and Figurative Paintings by Bergthor Morthens.
The dream of Jonas.
An Interview with Bergthor Morthens.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Bergthor Morthens, I am from Iceland where I was born in 1979 and I am currently living in Gothenburg Sweden. I graduated from the Fine Art Department of the Akureyri School of Visual Art in 2004 and finished a MFA degree in 2015 at the Valand Academy in Gothenburg Sweden. I have been active in exhibiting and have had recent solo exhibitions in Iceland, Romania and Sweden and group exhibitions in Iceland,Denmark, Sweden and Greece.

How you got into this?

The original plan was always to do something practical but the pull of art and especially oil painting was always to much. There are a lot of artist’s in my family, musicians and visual artists so I always thought it was exciting as a kid. My original plan was to go into graphic design but thankfully I ended up in the Fine Art department and I really started to take it seriously during my final year at the Akureyri School of art. After that there was really no going back and there is a constant need to paint.

What is your’ driving force?

It is a need to deal with the world around me and the things that are happening in society. My works have an emphasis on politics and history and painting is a way for me to communicate my thoughts and feelings.It is a way for me to involve myself in the political transactions of my time, to share in power or affect change – for myself as a painter.

What kind of work you do and why?

My work has evolved around a fascination about portraiture and figurative painting with a particular emphasis on politics and history. In my paintings I challenge many of the criteria’s of the painting tradition and flirt with the grotesque. They have a ground in a more classical representative painting, especially within the portrait and figurative tradition. After having finished the painting in this representative style I continue with the work in another, more abstract and expressionist style, one that has references to the gesture-led field of post-war expressionist painting. A turnaround that calls for a new interpretation and a different narrative. The blotch of colour comes in as a separate action contaminating the portrait, almost cancerous, altering it in the process. It alludes to Chromophobia or the fear of colour, prejudice against colour which masks a deep fear of a contamination by the unknown. I‘m looking at colour’s role as a subversive way to challenge established hierarchies, and as a way of undermining authority. 

Mixed Media Art by Olga Yefremova from Ukraine.

Mixed Media Art by Olga Yefremova from Ukraine.
An Interview with Olga Yefremova.


Who and where are you from?

My name is Olga Yefremova, I'm illustrator from Kiev, Ukraine.   

How you got into this?

I draw since my childhood ,then I studied painting at the Kyiv State Institute of decorative-applied art and design. M. Boichuk , but after graduating, i decide to leave painting, and during 9 years dint even try to draw something, so now I  start again. I open myself for possibilities of digital illustration , and this took all of me now .  

What is your driving force?

I’m fascinated by nature, by details. Sometimes I try to express my emotions, memories, thought. There are so many inspiring things around they drives me to work every day.

What kind of work you do and why?

I'm still try to find my way in art. I try to mix art in "material" and digital art. In my works I use some of my pencil drawings and digital graphics. For me is interesting to draw everything, this could be portraits, or ornaments, or simple illustrations for kids.

I keep improving and evolving as an artist.