Mixed Media Art by Claudio Parentela from Italy.

Mixed Media Art by Claudio Parentela from Italy.
An Interview with Claudio Parentela.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Claudio Parentela ….I’m 55 years old….I’m an Italian visual artist and a journalist free lance…I live in South Italy in  the ancient Magna Graecia….in a small and beautiful city called Catanzaro…

What brought you to Art?

I paint, I draw, I make collages, I write, I draw and I read tarots .... I draw weird comics .... since so many years ... since the far 1999 .... I chose to do this beautiful '' work '' because it makes me feel free .... it makes me feel well. ... it makes me aware of my limitations, it opens new worlds new doors, inside and outside of me. I feel like a great mixer, full of sounds, colors, voices, laughter’s, people, gestures .... I have drawn only in white and black for 15 years ..... then the color called me .... I started using 10,1000 different colors and to create with everything that I had under hand .... I love the strong contrasts, full of delicate and extreme emotions   .... I love the absolute contrast between white and black …and the 1000 shades that divide and unite the black and white .... I do a lot of photographs .... I love to photograph everything I like and that attracts my attention .... I like to dirty my photographs, to color them, to scratch them, to mix them with my drawings, with my ideas, with my heart.

What is your driving force?

So difficult and easy at the same time to answer…..many many things….different ,similar things inspire me continually every day to create….music….absolutely… first I need of good  music ….my cigarettes….and if it’s possible a good beer….My muses/ my inspirations vary every day…..Ghedalia Tazartes, Diamanda Galas, Shirley Horn, Patty Waters, Ornette Colemann, Sun Ra,Vivienne Westwood, John Galliano, Moschino, The Incapacitans, Alan Vega&Suicide, Hercules and Love Affair, Can, The Irrepressible ……much much fashion….underground comics…..my books…… Aurobindo and the Mother, Sai Baba, Tarots, Kundalini Yoga, Carolyne Miss, Alesteir Crowley…….my friends….their laughter’s….my garden with my cats and my beloved flowers….my wife….and our love!

What kind of work you do and why?

This is my wonderful ,fantastic work…. I could not do another work ... it makes me feel alive, real, myself, free .... the freedom is the only way for me to be in this wonderful world…. Art is the only way for me to be in this world, to feel free

Tell us more about your thought process.

I have new ideas in the morning ... in the afternoon ... in the evening ... at night ... always ... all the time ... I need only of good music, of my cigarettes, of a good glass of wine red .... and the magic happens every day ....surely because I love my work, because I created it and I create it continuously with joy and patience... I always create my freedom, this is the magic. It is a wonderful adventure, difficult, hard, full of surprises, full of splendid gifts ... every day. I find and create my style every day, I change my colors, my brushes, my pens, my papers every day. I reinvent myself every day. I like to experiment continuously .... I love experimenting. I love fashion .. .underground comics, my books, my cats.I draw and I paint continuously, every day. Continuously .... I read everything, I love to read ... I listen to everything.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I love Joel Peter Witkin ... his works / photos are pure light ... light in the flesh, perfection in the compositions, order in the horrendous chaos, beauty in the dark unconscious, precise idea in the turbulent emotions

15 Stunning Paintings by Bore Ivanoff from Paris.

 État de transe sur Champs-Élysées, Publicis Drugstore, Paris 8ème, huile sur toile, 61x46cm. 2016.
An Interview with Bore Ivanoff.

Who and where are you from?

At this period of my life I am comfortable to be known as Bore Ivanoff, an artist based in Paris, in France since almost 20 years, I am born somewhere in South-Eastern Europe 50 years ago.


What brought you to Art?

Well, whenever this question, even in quite different forms, comes to mind, or someone else asks me, it always brings a different answer ... Point one, and definitive reason which brought me to art is pretty mystical [...] I admit that one of the main reasons is that, there is nothing else that brings me more self-satisfaction and feeling of achievement than my artistic creation. Or, perhaps because my other dreams and life plans did not work out back in the time, so, Art had become the only option, and the only activity that saved me from the boredom of life, and had gave me the confidence of a value and superiority... a thirst to continue to live.


What is your driving force?

For me Paris it’s the kind of place that offers the right combination of inspiration and pain and suffering to keep me stimulated and painting.

As well I think, or more precisely I feel, that my personal driving force is a kind of explosive coctail which triggers my artistic inspiration, and which can be defined as ; my terifinig horror of boredom in combination of my boldness and my irresistible drive of self-fulfilment, self-observation, self-analize, an advanturism and aspiration, toward the victory over new, and as much more « impossible » and sophisticate challenghes as subject matters, to be translated on the canvas, and shared with the spectators.

What kind of work you do and why?

I always had that dificulty to call my art creation, work, in the pure and trivial sense of the word…
I simply want to experiment how far I can push reality to the other side where the “real” is still recognizable, but becoming totally abstract, building that tension until they are just one and the same. For me personaly, it is more like a kind of pleasure, a kind if drug addiction, a ritual, which makes me feel special and build these amazing bridges with the rest of the world… It, makes me feel so glad that my artworks are touching the souls and the minds of so many people around the world.

Definetely, for me this is an attempting an escape from the banal, conventional view of reality, transforming subjects into spellbounding icons, enchanting the viewer- through a total transcendental perception.

Tell us more about your thought process.

In my recent artworks I am aspiring to create a dialogue steeped in conceptualism and transmitted through realism, turning the perception of reality in on itself ; to a universe where, though the « real » is still recognizable,it manifests as subtle  abstraction.
With technical mastery, with intimate choice of specific subjects, with creative imagination and artistic research, I visibly and subtly « dematerealize » and « de-realitize » everyday scenes, transforming and, recompose them into a fantastic reality.

Which is re-enforced by the joint integration of color, content and iconography, giving to my figurative compositions a larger conceptual aspect, which represents a collection of mesmerising artworks.

All of mine artworks are exclusively executed in the oil on canvas technique, hand made without any technical devices employed in the process of creation.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

For me, one of the living legends of Modern Fine-Art is the great American artist, the magician Don Eddy. I believe that once you see his artistic creation, you will undoubtedly fall under the magic of his art.

10 Lyrics by K.K. Foster from New Jersey.

10 Lyrics by K.K. Foster from New Jersey.

An Interview with K.K. Foster.

Who and where are you from?

My name is K.K. Foster and I am 34 years old and live in New Jersey. I am a lyricist and artist. I am also a full-time teacher at a private school for children with language-based learning differences. 

What brought you to Lyrics Writing?

When I was about 12 years old, I started to really get into writing poetry. My older sister was a beautiful writer (and still is) and rarely did I get to read her work, but when I was lucky enough to, I was blown away by her ability to describe feelings and emotions, painting these pictures in my mind as I read. I wanted to write like she did, and so writing became another hobby of mine that I loved and worked at. Around the age of 14, I started trying to write song lyrics. I have always loved to sing and listen to music because it has always evoked so much emotion for me. I find that music is incredibly universal and no matter what you are going through or what you are thinking or feeling, there is a song out there that you can connect with. I want to be a songwriter who writes those lyrics.

What is your driving force?

I would have to say that my driving force is that lyrics and art and love are a huge part of who I am. Writing lyrics has been a way for me to express myself, either when I wasn’t sure how to verbalize what was in my head or my heart, or when I just wasn’t ready to express something. From the first set of lyrics I’ve ever written, I’ve always said that my biggest goal in life is to have one song out in the world that people can listen to. I wanted to write something meaningful that people could connect with. I love music and I love the way a song can make me feel. I wanted to make others feel something with my words. I love love, and I write what I feel, think, or see. Over the past several years, my focus has been on writing lyrics and drawing the heart and eyes, two things that fascinate me. I’ve done some small drawings for people throughout the years, and it has always been an amazing feeling when someone likes something I’ve done. In addition, I’ve co-written two songs with an acoustic duo; one is on their YouTube channel, and titled “Happy.” These songs have been performed at bars, weddings, and on the local news. So my continued driving force is to share my heart and soul through my lyrics and hope that someday they can become that song that someone falls in love with.

What kind of work you do and why?

I write song lyrics, lyrical poetry, and I draw. As I’ve mentioned, I write because it’s a form of self-expression for me. Drawing provides the same feeling. It is this wordless opportunity for me to share my thoughts and feelings, or to simply relax and escape for a few moments. I love pencil sketch and ever since I was young, that has always been my medium of choice. As a lyricist and artist, I am always looking to be challenged and inspired by other’s work, and appreciate the many talents that exist around this world. I do this work for myself, and I hope someday I can collaborate and write songs with singer-songwriters. I would love to create something that others find meaning in or can connect with. The world is a big place, but it would be amazing for someone to read or listen to something that I have written and feel connected, knowing they aren’t alone in this world.

Tell us more about your thought process.

My thought process when I write is generally inspired by something I am feeling or an experience I’ve had or witnessed, to my hopes and prayers for the future. I find inspiration all around me, from a noise to a word someone says, or a scene from show on television. Nature, music, human interactions and emotions - all of these things can excite something in me and so I write down a quick lyric. Sometimes it turns into a full set of song lyrics while other times, it remains a short lyrical poetry piece. 

Please share with us the one modern Lyricist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I have constantly amazed and in awe of the talent that exists in the world of music and songwriting. It is honestly hard to pick just one as there are singer-songwriters who have been a part of my journey since I first started trying to write lyrics. One of my favorite singer-songwriters is Sara Bareilles. Her lyrics and her music are beautiful. When I hear her sing or read her lyrics, I feel like I am part of an experience. Each song is a story unto itself. I have found that she has a way of capturing emotion in a way unlike anyone else. Another singer-songwriter that inspires me is Andrew McMahon. His songs are detailed and emotive, always expanding my mind as to what it means to write a song. Further, Missy Higgins is one of my favorite singer-songwriters because her songs are unique and take you on a lovely journey filled with emotion and perspectives that feel relatable and real. She writes songs with passion and that is conveyed in her lyrics. Finally, another huge inspiration for me is Ed Sheeran. His songs feel like love and the human experience brought to life through music and words. I feel like every word he puts into a song has a specific purpose and evokes a memory or feeling in the listener and that is truly incredible. What I admire about all of these artists is that their work is so visual and their lyrics are written with so much imagery that each song is a gift to experience.

15 Beautiful Birds Illustrations by Daniel Merac.

15 Beautiful Birds Illustrations by Daniel Merac.
Great Egret
An Interview with Daniel Merac.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Daniel Merac, I’m a visual artist and an industrial designer from Colombia, who loves traditional illustration, nature, indie rock music, comics, guitars, daydreaming and birding.

How you got into this?

Back in 2015 while I was about to graduate as an Industrial designer, I decided to take a drawing challenge called Inktober, which is now very popular among the traditional art community and consists on making an ink drawing for every day of October. Little did I know that entering this challenge was the first step that would take me on the journey of finding this wonderful passion of creating art. The experience with Inktober awakened my desire of creating hand-drawn visual pieces, which had been hibernating for long. I think it was put to sleep during university, right after my days of school when I couldn’t help but draw on my notebooks during the uninteresting classes, which were actually quite a bunch, so I had plenty of time to practice my doodles back then.

This feeling for creating and drawing grew on me exponentially during that drawing challenge, so that when it was over I felt that I needed more of that, and through practice, I slowly found the determination to follow that unexpected artistic path. It shocks me to think that if I hadn't tried Inktober that year, who knows how many time would've passed before I figured out about this passion. That’s why I always recommend this challenge to every artist or an aspiring one, whether they’re willing to get into art or they’re already experienced creators, it teaches consistency, resolution, and it lets you focus on your own voice as an artist.


What is your driving force?

Rock music and nature are the elements that make my nest, meaning my home or as a friend would say, my bonfire, that thing that lights up your being and keeps you warm while you’re in the middle of the dark.  They give me calm, shelter, inspiration, and along with art, they allow me to express in a much more comfortable and fluent way. My recent connection with nature is slowly transforming my vision of life and also my plans and dreams. One of those dreams that motivates me to create more, is to be able to give back to nature and help to restore and protect the environment and its wonderful but endangered fauna.


What kind of work you do and why?

My work revolves around the creatures that inhabit nature, they are often the leading characters in my illustrations. I draw them because the process is greatly enjoyable and also I do it to put them in the spotlight so people can have the chance to know these species exist, and later on develop more empathy towards them, possibly taking action when it comes to protecting them and their environment.

I work in traditional and digital mediums, but for my illustrations, I really prefer to work with my hands. A pencil and a fine liner are just enough. On the other hand, for making animations of my drawings I do have to rely on my computer. I also enjoy drawing stories, places, and people, although since I got into birding around June of this year, I haven’t stopped drawing birds. These winged creatures really captivated me, and therefore my recent work is full of them. I just can’t help it. Also, I happen to live in Cali, the city with the highest amount of bird species in Colombia. 561 in total. So I guess that explains a bit my love for birds.

Tell us more about your thought process.

The symbolism and meanings of species of fauna and flora across the different cultures captivate me just as the forms, textures, colors, and sounds of each creature. When I’m planning a new illustration or a series I like to look into those elements and combine them in a piece that may resonate with someone. Through this, I just aim to help a little bit to strengthen the link that people have with nature.

When it comes to my visual style, I think indie rock and post-rock have had a huge influence on it. The loudness and sounds of this music are present in the textures of my illustrations, the messy lines, the noise of the pointillism, and the high contrast. Just as these genres do, my artwork is in constant change, I try to keep in mind that there’re always new things to explore, learn and improve. This constant variation of style and subjects is key to me because it helps me to keep the process interesting and exciting.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I love the art of illustrator and concept artist J.A.W. Cooper, I admire the bond she has with nature and the way she translates it into her artwork is truly amazing. I definitely recommend checking out her illustrations.

Figurative Blue Paintings by Zrinka Budimlija.

Figurative Blue Paintings by Zrinka Budimlija.
An Interview with Zrinka Budimlija.

Who and where are you from?


My Name is Zrinka Budimlija and I am originally from Zagreb, Croatia but I live in Cologne, Germany. I paint, but I am also an author and sped much of my time writing.

What brought you to Art?


I have always been creative. Even as a kid, I would rather draw or write poems than anything else. As a teenager I went to an art school and afterwards I studied art in Zagreb and Cologne. I can spend hours painting or writing. It is the best way to spend my time apart from being with my family. 

What is your driving force?


Love of beauty and knowledge, that is something I would call my driving force. It is important to me to understand people, and to find beauty in the way we interact, even if it does not always seem beautiful. There is a poetry to life, and I am keen to find it and try to capture it in my work.

What kind of work you do and why?


The paintings that I now paint are predominantly blue. I choose a limited palette of blues, whites and blacks. The inspiration for the paintings comes from old photos, either from my family, or photos that I find on flea markets. In my work I use abstract elements along with realism. This way I can split the moment shown on the photo from the space around it which allows me to try to evoke an imagined inner impression of the past moment.



Tell us more about your thought process.

The way I think about the paintings and the photographs that preceded them is non verbal. I try to let my feelings steer me in the way I choose the motifs and the way I paint them. This is an excellent way to meditate and escape the tyranny of verbal and logical thinking, that is so highly valued in the western society. When I think with my feelings, I get this visceral response to what I am painting, and that shows me the direction I am supposed to go to. 

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?


I find the work of Pascal Fendrich very intriguing. In his work he searches to find the gaps between perception and reality. 

Abstract Paintings by Corinne Natel.

Abstract Paintings by Corinne Natel.
An Interview with Corinne Natel.


Who and where are you from?

I’m Corinne Natel, an abstract artist from London, UK.

How you got into this?

I was creative from a young age and enjoyed painting. I came to a crossroads at degree level between choosing to study Fine Art or Media Production. I thought I should study Media Production. I went on to work as a web designer which was quite creative.

After a few years of working I knew something was missing. I started painting again and knew that was the missing piece! I then got the opportunity to leave my job and do some freelance web design work and this enabled me to have the freedom to paint more and develop my art career. Painting is my ultimate passion and I feel lost if I don’t paint for a while!

What is your driving force?

To create and be a successful artist! I am lucky to have the freedom to be able to create art. It’s a great feeling to be doing something that I love and also so rewarding when people connect to what I am doing. I love how painting makes me feel a sense of freedom, escapism and is the ultimate form of expression. I enjoy how I can go on a journey when painting, from a blank white canvas to creating something new. I feel complete making art and I know that I am supposed to be doing this, that it is my purpose (dharma).


What kind of work you do and why?

I specialise in abstract mixed media fluid paintings. Currently I am working with resin and inks. My main inspirations are nature, fashion, travel and media. I am always inspired by the seasons and time of year and this usually reflects in my work and also colour investigation. I aim to create vibrant and emotive works.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I use a lot of negative space in my works. When I was studying my art teacher introduced me to the works of Alberto Giacometti, who is one of my ultimate inspirations! I learnt so much from his pieces which focused on investigating space and how this worked in relation to his subjects. I'm always looking for the space in my work. It's creating the balance between matter and space that allows the painting to flow and breathe.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

I love the works of  Karin Vermeer for the stunning technique and colours and also Julia Benz for beautiful use of colours.

Faces by Mayro Toyo.

Mix Media Art by Mayro Toyo.
An Interview with Mayro Toyo.

Who and where are you from?

I'm Mayro Toyo, Venezuelan based in Argentina. I have a graphic design background and I draw since I was a child with attention deficit disorder, about 6 years old. Always been attracted to colors and cartoons. My environment wasn't favorable because I grew up in a industrial/oil country and people wasn't too connected with the art but I kept the faith and the thirst to learn from the greatest artists.

What brought you to Art?

Im not sure what is is I would call it natural force, I've always thought that I was born for this.

What is your driving force?

Love, when people get connected with my work there's an interchange of positive vibes, love and gratefulness. Some people think that peace is the goal and they go do war instead of doing  art, I can't get that.

What kind of work you do and why?

I mix painting and drawing because both are my strengths. I work with acrylics because of the immediacy and the oils because of the texture (I try not to mix them in the same canvas). I like pastels because I can draw freely and I like the trace I can get.

Tell us more about your thought process.

I like the interesting faces, the human expressions, the subtle gestures, face and body, my exploration goes through the human fragility, the sensible point where I can intervene it like unexpected with colors, abstract shapes. In some way I like handle with the oposites things and make them coexist in the same canvas.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Cesar Biojo, because in some way he mixes oposites figurative and abstract.

Street / Pop Art by Jeremy Wolff.

Street / Pop Art by Jeremy Wolff.
An Interview with Jeremy Wolff.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Jeremy Wolff, I am from New Jersey but reside in Manhattan, New York City. I have always been a city boy.

What brought you to Art?

I have always had a keen eye for art. I was always intrigued by all aspects, whether it was sculpture, classical paintings, glass windows from churches and temples. I was fascinated by the creative process. As a kid, I always signed up for wood shop or pottery as electives at day camp. I loved the feeling of finishing something and people being impressed or blown away that I had done it. That feeling still exists in my work today.

What is your driving force?

Success. I want to be as successful as possible using my skill, what I feel I was meant to do. I look at my art as an opportunity to become a true entrepreneur. To allow me to do things I would have never thought were possible. To meet and talk to people who i otherwise would never be able to talk to if it werent for my art. It is really an awesome and humbling feeling when you really stop and think about it that way as a big picture.

What kind of work you do and why?

I'd say I do a Street/Pop Art that has a contemporary feel to it. I like my paintings to be a collaborative effort with my clients. A lot of the time we speak and work together to create the piece that, for one, they will love, but also, make sure it's still in line with my message and overall feeling of my art.

Tell us more about your thought process.

My thought process for most things I do are in terms of whether or not this will advance my career or not. At first I was always a yes man, yes to everything. I had to get my name out there. But now I have been way more selective in terms of the projects I take on.


What do you have planned for the near future.

Art Basel is right around the corner. I have A LOT planned and hope I meet as many people as possible. I have my own solo show booth at Spectrum Art Fair- Booth S1105. I will also be painting a Lamborghini which will be around for everyone to see and take pictures with during Basel week.
Also, I have my first Solo Show Exhibition scheduled for Thursday, March 1st at Contra Galleries, in Chelsea, Manhattan, New York CIty.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

A Couple Modern Artist that I look up to are guys like @Kaws and Jeff Koons. Both of these guys are on the global spectrum of art and it various mediums. They are really people that inspire me to never be satisfied with where I am at right now. Still so much to accomplish.

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Paul Yunin.

Dark Surrealism Paintings by Paul Yunin.
Soulmates 87x61cm (34x24in) Oil, hardboard.
An Interview with Paul Yunin.

Who and where are you from? 

Paul Yunin, a painter from Russia, working in St. Petersburg. 

What brought you to Art? 

By education I am an engineer. I was brought to art by the love for the muse about 5-6 years ago. But I was completely immersed in painting only in 2016. The creative half won engineering in me. I originally started working in interior painting, painted on demand, but then realized that I was closer to being an artist rather than a craftsman. 

What is your driving force? 

I have a desire to talk to the audience, I have something to say. Also, I have a need for experiment and a search for new ways of expressing an idea. Starting my work, I do not know what I will end up with. I direct the brush that gives birth to images on the canvas which my subconscious suggests to me. The inspiration for the plots is my relationships with people, nature, maybe even with God and also with other forms of art.

I prefer Renaissance artists: Leonardo Da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, etc. When painting my work, I mostly use the scumble technique of painting. It unites me with Renaissance artists, with symbolism and some mysticism of their artworks. It is worth noting such kings of dark art as Zidzislav Beckinsky and Hans Rudy Giger. If we talk about cinema, the works of Trier, Kubrick, Tarkovsky and other directors, similar in spirit are close to me.

What kind of work you do and why? 

I paint in the genre of dark surrealism. But I'm not trying to stay within the frames of the genre. Rather, on the contrary, I am trying to avoid stamps that have developed in different kinds of dark styles of world art. I don’t have a goal to depict a horror story, cause anxiety in the viewer.

Tell us more about your thought process. 

At the beginning of my work, I'm tuning in to the wave of maximum openness of soul and sincerity. I trying to paint my surreal artworks truly, as Friedrich Nietzsche had said "writing with own blood". My task is to convey the light and darkness of my own experiences, feelings, thoughts as accurately as possible with the help of non-verbal images, and if I may say so - of the archetypes. I don’t write extramundane worlds. I paint what is here and now, trying to pack the prose of reality into a bright poetic form. Behind the gloomy atmosphere of my works there are hidden the revelations of the subconscious, deep, perhaps vulnerable sensuality, religious mysticism and even lyricism. Behind thorn spikes, suffering of heroes and unearthly matters there is spiritual nakedness, liberation from the burdensome conventions of the surrounding world and striving for truth, at all cost, whether it is pleasant or cruel.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Alexander Kostetsky (Russ. Александр Владимирович Костецкий, Ukr.Олександр Володимирович Костецький;, November 14, 1954 in Kiev – January 4, 2010 in Kiev) was a Ukrainian painter and sculptor. His name has various transliterations into English and variants include Aleksandr Kostetsky, Alexander Kostecky, Alexander Kostetski and Aleksandr Kosteckij. His artist stile is Magic Realism.

Figurative Paintings by Victoria Selbach.

Figurative Paintings by Victoria Selbach.
An Interview with Victoria Selbach.

​Who and where are you from?

Victoria Selbach, born in Pittsburgh PA, moved to NYC after high school and have lived in NY ever since.

How you got into this? 

I have always loved seeing and building images.


What is your driving force? 

The light and my connection to women.


What kind of work you do and why? 

I am primarily creating powerful images of women. This journey allows me to explore the diversity and makeup of who we are, uncover how we see ourselves, confront how we are seen and excavate the legacy of what we carry and then pass on to the next generation.

Figurative Paintings by Lou McCulloch.

Figurative Expressionism Paintings by Lou (Ella) McCulloch from Medina, Ohio, USA.
Bullied girl
An Interview with Lou (Ella) McCulloch.

Who and where are you from?

My name is Lou (Ella) McCulloch and I am from Medina, Ohio, USA, a rural town south of Cleveland, with a small village atmosphere.

What brought you to Art?

I have always thought of myself as an artist.  It is in my DNA, with both grandmothers accomplished artists.  One grandmother, who I never knew, was a fine artist who painted in a traditional style.  My other grandmother painted anything around here with a method similar to grandma Moses.

What is your driving force?

My driving force is my sanity.  I love to see that first splash of color on paper-to see what is in store for me from my muse.  I was trained as a watercolorist in art school, so that medium is the most reflective in my work.

What kind of work you do and why?

I am a ‘Figurative Expressionism’ artist. I do my background first-whether it be acrylic, ink or graphite, then I generally set it aside until I start to see figures in it.  I let the canvas or painting speak to me.  I seldom have an idea in mind for a drawing, unless I have been inspired by a vintage image I have seen. I have always been fascinated by old photographs and even wrote a book about them.


Tell us more about your thought process.

I frequently have paintings in various stages of completion.  I will survey my drawings or paintings each day and see which one needs attention.  my feelings for that day are often expressed in my work.  I also like to experiment with new supplies.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Marc Chagall is a modern artist that I have always admired.  He has a dream-like quality to his paintings and finds figures in the shapes and color patterns.  His work is also mainly based on emotional association.

Paintings by Pedro Covo.

Paintings by Pedro Covo.

From the Brush of Artist Pedro Covo.


I am from a city by the Caribbean coast of Colombia called Cartagena de Indias, my mother is a teacher and my father is a Neurologist. My love for art started when I was a little kid, around 4 years old, I was amused at that time by my older brother ``paintings``, he used to do draw this cardboard characters, from superman to Sigurd the famous hero from Nordic mythology, and put them to fight in front of me to keep me busy while my parents were not at home.

At the age of 10, my mother was named headmistress of the University of fine arts in Cartagena, so I got to spend most of my evenings after school running around those classrooms. But actually I didn't wanted to study arts until I was 16 years old and I faced the hard question of what do you want to do the rest of your life. It was not an easy choice but my parents and all my family where very supportive.

I studied visual arts at the Javeriana university, to do animation, but soon enough realized that I wanted to focus on drawing and painting, and I was really lucky to had amazing teachers such as Felipe Machado, Nicolas Uribe and Justiniano Duran.

Coming from an illustration background I developed a very specific method for image making, to be very methodical really helped me with hard deadlines. So I applied this same method to my personal work, but instead of using someone else’s text I provide my own, from my quotidian experiences. That's how my swimmer serie started, basically from texts and drawings from my sketchbook.

I became obsessed by the idea of telling the story that only I could tell, to contribute with something exclusively personal, providing my vision of the world without falling in the most obvious visual solutions or clichés. That's what I attempted to do with the swimmers.
Obviously Cartagena is a city full of problems and contrast, but that was not my reality, I was just trying to be honest to who I am and where I come from, and I took the work of artist like Alejandro Obregon and Pierre Daguet who lived and painted in Cartagena as my main references.

I usually know all the subjects I paint, this is extremely important for me because I believe that if I paint my mother, there is no other artist in the world that can paint her the way I do, and this is something I want to believed is reflected in the final result,and could be appreciated by the spectator.

That is why you would notice most of my nude paintings, wich are all live digital paintings had no faces. This is in order to be able to share this images in social media without creating gossip and pre judgment, something typical in Cartagena`s society.

After finishing my university undergraduate in 2011 I got a job at the French Canadian illustration agency colagene, where I learned a lot about the illustration and advertisement business and did several jobs for important magazines and tv channels. My last job with them was to illustrate Margriet Ruus beautiful children`s book  ``The elephant keeper`` which is going to be publish by Kids can press in Ontario Canada this October. This has been one of the most gratifying experiences of my editorial career because of the audience and the story itself.  
A tale of an African Child that after saving an elephant from drowning, becomes an elephant keeper in an orphanage. A good portion of the royalties of the book are going to the Lilaya elephants Orphanage.

But after finishing the book I found myself unhappy with the result of most of my editorial work and enjoying more and more the work I produced In my spare time, so I decided to try to pursuit career on painting.

That is how I won a full scholarship in the Savannah colleague of art and design in Georgia United States, to do a 2 year MFA on painting. 
I decided to study visual arts 11 years ago to be able to do what I enjoy the most as a job for the rest of my life, and my ambitions have not change since then.

Paintings by Czech Miguel Barragán from Mexico.

Paintings by Czech Miguel Barragán from Mexico.
An Interview with Czech Miguel Barragán.

Who and where are you from?

I'm from Mexico.

What brought you to Art?

Since I was a little kid I love to make art, it was my way to feel alive and to stop the time. later in my life, i keep doing it for the same reason. The differences are that I am much better doing it.

What is your driving force?

The ability to stop the time and be free, so I want to pass this experience to other people and to give them the opportunity to feel alive.

What kind of work you do and why?

I paint, why because I love it 

Tell us more about your thought process.

I look for the things that move me, that provokes me. the things I feel that they need to be free and to be shared with the world 


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

His Name is Cesar Biojo and Why because he is not just another painter he is an inspiration for another artist, he invites them to keep doing what they are doing.

Black cartoons by Zeinab Niche.

Thought Provoking Black cartoons by Zeinab Niche from Tehran, Iran
An Interview with Zeinab Niche.

Who and where are you from?

My name's Zeinab Niche, born on May 13, 1984 in Tehran, Iran. Graduated in Graphic Arts and Master of Animation.

What brought you to Art?

First of all, my passion and desire made me strive for the arts, but after completing my academic career, I became more serious in art, and it was also due to problems that occurred in my community.

What is your driving force?

I am convinced by my driving force for painting and caricature or so-called designs ... Sometimes my concern is sometimes my concern and sometimes the events of the day or the actions that have been done in the past and its impact is already in our lives.

What kind of work you do and why?

Well, after a real painting period, I was drawn to the cartoon, and I liked this space more and impressed me ... and the reason why I was working out a black cartoon:

I live in a limited, censorship country, a country that looks different and different. A tremendous rich and wealthy nation, and disadvantaged people, class differences, lies and the absence of a nation and state And these are the hidden pains among my people. I really liked to paint flowers and nature rather than drawing black and white images, but living conditions are not normal here.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Yes
A talented artist called saeed baba'ee
Which unfortunately is not raised.

Figurative Paintings by Ráth Márton.

Figurative Paintings by Ráth Márton.
An Interview with Ráth Márton.


Who and where are you from?

My father and grandfather were artists too, in this case I herited some talent from them.


How you got into this?

I love art so much, that the good music, everyday happenings in my life inspires me. My goal is to know my art in  world wide.

What is your driving force?

Oil paints, aquavarell also pen is my favourite tools. This is how I can show my thoughts myself in my artworks. The colours is really important to me, like every artists I like to use them, to make every work unique.

What kind of work you do and why?

Once I addicted to oil paintings, other time I like aquarell. It depends what I draw and paint, much like pure nude works and erotic pictures.

Tell us more about your thought process.

When I paint or work on my latest arts, I can let my thoughts fly, I can thinking clearly.  For istance, love everyday happenings, or new ideas, I like listening to music while I doing my work.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

Serge Marshennikov is my inspired artists because I love his erotic pure nude works, I love his ideas of women bodies and the lambrequin harmony.

Figurative Paintings by Jerney Marisha.

Figurative Paintings by Jerney.
An Interview with Jerney Marisha.

Who and where are you from?

I was born in the Netherlands 38 years ago, but I live in Antwerp at the moment. I'm a bit of an idealist but I try not to be too dogmatic about it. I work in mental health care, which I love, but on mondays I'm not doing anything but making art. 

What brought you to Art?

I always had a creative spark inside of me. Whenever my mother was painting or creating sculptures in ceramics I would join her. There have been some periods of creative outbursts from time to time, but sooner or later I would always find myself distracted. About a year ago I realised how much I missed creating. I decided then and there that I would make time for it at least one day a week and now I'm really starting to find my way as I'm tumbling down the rabbit hole. 

What is your driving force?

It makes me happy.

What kind of work you do and why?

I'm still exploring and experimenting, but I do have a preference for limited palettes and this summer I fell in love with painting on wood. The wood helps me to work intuitively and I like to incorporate the little imperfections of the wood into the story now and then.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Honestly, the less I think about it, the better. Usually I like to work my way out of a dark background. Often I try to find my story in the wood grain and just take it from there. I'm drawn to symbolism, story art and wistful women. 

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find interesting and why?

There are so many! But I really like Victor Otero Carbonell. I love his use of colour and his work reminds me of Schiele. I have a soft spot for artists who aren't afraid of self portraits.

Longest Alpona or Rangoli Art to celebrate Durga Puja Festival Kolkata.

Longest Alpona or Rangoli Art to celebrate Durga Puja festival Kolkata. Photo Credit :-  Camellia Bhowmik
Longest Alpona or Rangoli Art to celebrate Durga Puja festival Kolkata. Photo Credit :-  Camellia Bhowmik
It's a sensational Art created by 322 Art College Students overnight and gifted Kolkata one unique creation Longest Alpona (sacred art painting to celebrate the upcoming Durga Puja festival). A 1.4km long Alpona or Rangoli art on Lake Road in South Kolkata, India.

Surreal Paintings by Boris Indrikov.

Surreal Paintings by Boris Indrikov.
THE PREMONITION 
An Interview with Boris Indrikov.

Who and where are you from?

I’m a surrealist artist from Russia. My mother gave drawing lessons while working at school, so I was familiar with art since my childhood. Then I decided to become an engineer and then I studied at the National University of Science and Technology (MISiS). In 1990, I left the university and decided to become an artist. This idea had been slowly crystallizing while I studied. And one day I asked myself: “what do you want, man”? And the answer was to become an artist. And now I’m doing something I’ve always wanted to.

How you got into this?

I attended the courses at the different art studios taught by professional artists. But my principal teachers are the masters of the European Renaissance of XIV-XVII centuries.

What is your driving force?

I guess this is constant asking myself about who I am. In my opinion, an artist is a creator of parallel universes and going through them is a kind of ritual. For me working with a painting is like a meditation. A language of art is the language in which we talk to God.

What kind of work you do and why?

Taking about the format of my works, I prefer large canvases. Further I'm going to do some sculptures and some kind of fabric design.

Tell us more about your thought process.

Can you remember Michelangelo’s words? «Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it».My method of making a painting is a bit similar with the only distinction: the extraction of the image takes its place from the texture that I create on a canvas.


Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting?

Alexander Sigov, Vladislav Erko, Olga Dugina and Andrej Dugin.

Portrait Paintings by Nena Stojanovic.

Portrait Paintings by Nena Stojanovic.
An Interview with Nena Stojanovic.

Who and where are you from?

I’m Nena Stojanovic and I was born on September 28th, 1973 in Ivanjica. Just prior to the year 2000, I left my homeland Serbia to move to Nafplio, the first capital of Greece, where I still live today, happily married and a mother of two beautiful children.

What brought you to Art?

As the daughter of an engineer, painter and wood craftsman and designer, I grew up being amazed by the art created around me. The arts existed in the lives of many in my family circles, always feeding and influencing my growth and development as an artist. When at school, this was evident as my curiosity urged me to be the best in my classes. I was always involved in the arts and my artwork was always featured in displays. In 1987, when I was a sixth grade student, my project was selected in the contest "Best children's drawings of Yugoslavia" to be printed in the book "Poems for grandfather” by famous Serbian poet, Milovan Vitezovic. Outside art, I excelled in gymnastics where I collected 10 medals, a broken tooth, and what became an interest in dentistry. I graduated from the Medical School of Belgrade earning a degree as a dental technician.

What is your driving force?

Undoubtedly, my feelings and only my feelings … Very ordinary conversations, the joy of my family members, meetings with dear people, exchange of experiences, presence in innocence and intact nature, exploration of new destinations ... these are the things that make me happy and which are the main drivers of my feelings and therefore the inspiration that leads me towards painting.

What kind of work do you do and why?

All artists evolve through their work seeking a way in which they will recognize themselves. I am the type of person who is not always satisfied with the same results. After years of researching myself in my work, I feel I definitely belong to abstract art, as well as to painting portraits in some specific way, covered with elements of abstraction. Although technically, my abstract works are the best, my portraits are more effective. The point of my portraits is not perfection painting but the subject's characteristic eye expressiveness through which I try to convey all mental tensions and transitions to the psyche of each observer. This is all about my own continued personal exploration and research.

Tell us more about your thought process.

The process of creating my works, as I already mentioned, depends on the current mood and my feelings. For me there is no planning. My approach to any kind of work is always instinctive and intuitive. This includes material selection, selection of color combinations as well as the technical approach. I would like to point out that I am among the rare painters who use enamel paint. Surely this is a difficult way to reach the desired effect. This is my personal challenge and a way to create a unique and different result.

Please share with us the one modern artist whose work you find Interesting and why?

This is definitely the hardest question for me. I generally do not use the word favorite. I would usually say one of my favorites but when it comes to painters, I cannot even say that. There are so many talented artists whose creations I adore and whom I admire and so many branches of painting it is impossible to choose only one artist. Although I haven’t been overly active lately, you can check out the list of artists I love and follow on my Saatchi Art portfolio. Thank you.

Art by Beppo Zuccheri.

Art by Beppo Zuccheri.
Untitled - Mixed media on paper - Cm 50x70 - 2017.
From the Brush of Beppo Zuccheri.

On Knowing and Making.

The key element lies in the union of two different natures meeting, and often fighting, within me. On the one hand, the necessity, at times to become obsessive, to observe, know, understand… On the other, an impatient istinct to create, build and represent all that I realize, or think I know.

I have a great passion for philosophy, ancient history, mythology, the sciences in general, and all those branches of knowledge that somehow give me the feeling that I can give meaning to my life, to life more generally, to death and to all that is known or unknown. To know, elaborate, realize, identify myself as much as possible with someone else… To manipulate… To play with time, space and the awareness of it all… Art (the act of making with one’s hands, and through the medium of matter) comes as a consequence of this. It is the instinctive and natural means to give shape and an apparent logic to what I have devised in my mind, or to what I haven’t devised at all but which is nevertheless there and makes itself felt. I would never be able to write, or tell such things in words… I am far too impatient for that… I need to ‘fix’ what I have in my mind through matter and stroke, and I certainly do so… I tie it, I paste it, I nail it and show it to others. I need to have witnesses… Not in order to explain or teach… Nor in order to share… It is merely the illusion, or the unmistakable proof of having captured what is obsessing me.


On Matter and Painting.

The tecnique, style and pictorial research in my works are a consequence of all this… They are a means, a go-between… A frenzied weapon of both creation and destruction at the same time. At the very moment that I start a work, I use everything I have at my disposal, I almost never keep at hand a list of the instruments I need. That is why to me, matter and materials come even before painting itself. First I must build, tie and compose… No blank canvas in front of me, for the principle inherent in my whole work is not that of the void. The principle is chaos… The undetermined… Creation, on the other hand, is determination, it is a backward journey undertaken in order to grasp the mold. Principle and mold… Chaos and harmony… The starting point and the ends… A motionless journey. The ship lying still, stuck into matter. It is not the art of recycling, nor is it ‘Arte Povera’… It is the art of frenzy, of struggle. Painting comes after matter, I said, for painting, differently from mere matter, pushes you into entering another dimension… its purpose is to give depth… it is the key that opens a door, so as to persuade one to enter what the humble creator has created, or re-created. By contrast mere matter, just as is the case with sculpture, represents elements that actually enter the dimension and spaces of those who are observing them

I have the presumption to open myself up and open up a world, too. Even when I am only employing the stroke, such as in drawings or in less matter-oriented works, I feel the necessity to dig a groove on paper or wood… Always hard surfaces, all of them… Pencils or brushes that dig, enter and hurt… And hurt me, too. It is always a small battle, anyway. The sensation of having completed a work never, or almost never comes from an aesthetic, visual or conceptual point of view… But from the knowledge of having been the winner in a painful duel that has deeply scarred me.

On Masters, Heroes and Imitation.

It is not by chance that my own, once unknowing cultural education features few painters, sculptors or specific artistic movements.

I have always chased madmen and visionaries… Warriors, philosophers, poets, scientists… Myths, explorations and events that satisfy my hunger for knowledge through the destruction of dogmas and the search for the unknown. A gnostic, intuitive kind of knowledge… No theorem or equation. No idealism… The awareness of intuition and the re-evaluation of a certainty that has been revealed and proved… Just a small and presumptuous catalyst paying tribute to the Heroes of the time, destroyers of time. An artisan who is in a hurry to reveal to himself, too, that he has understood, realized and captured… That he, in his own way and through the use of matter, has put time and space into perspective within a small perimeter. The mind that is hungry for knowledge… The hands that are eager to do


Technique, style… there are so many artists I esteem and chase! I don’t even know the name of some of them…  Another kind of masters, to me… From them I have stolen and still steal through my hands, enriching myself by a small loot, a little treasure. Technique… no illusion of creating or re-creating anything new, no claim to any likeness or unlikeness. What is indeed there is the presumption to use them as my instruments for making… Instruments which are useful to figuration and composition, as are the symbols that often recur in my works… Ladders, knots, rags, fishes, nudes, masks, Pinocchio noses, unintelligible writings, boats that lie abandoned or tied to the pier, all of them lying still… Kiefer, De Dominicis, Vedova, Bacon, Rohtko and who knows how many others... Instruments. Extremely esteemed instruments for making and representing.